2 years ago #1
shea
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angel fish eggs now wrigglers.

Can i move the slate into my fry tank at this stage or is it to late?

should wait for them to be free swimming and siphon them out

Thanks

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2 years ago #2
johnarthur
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If they still have the adhesive spot on their collective heads, you may be able to move the wigglers and spawning media all at once. However, angelfish eggs/fry at this stage are very delicate, and may not survive the move. A better alternative may be moving the parents.

If you do move the wigglers to a smaller aquarium, fill it with water from the spawning tank, and be sure to include some substrate material or a dirty filter pad to transfer the nitrogen cycle bacteria. The new tank will need a heater and small filter, a full hood and almost daily partial water changes of about ten percent. The fry will not eat while they still have a yolk sac.

I usually leave the parents in the spawning tank until the fry start to grow actual fins and look a bit like angelfish. The fry seem to do better with the parents, but there is always a chance they will eat the fry if they feel threatened.

Good luck, and please keep us posted.

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2 years ago #3
shea
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Thank you for the info i was going to squeeze the contents from the spawning tank sponge filter into teh new fry filter.

Would this work?

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2 years ago #4
johnarthur
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It should. When the fry start to eat, they will miss lots of the food, and the uneaten food should be removed using a turkey baster or small syphon. They also need clean water. This assumes the grow out tank is small, about ten gallons.

When I raise angelfish fry in a 37 tall aquarium, it only needs weekly partial water changes.

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2 years ago #5
shea
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its a ten gallon tank.

Thanks again for your help. will it matter if the eggs contact air fr a few seconds

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2 years ago #6
johnarthur
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No. The eggs should be safe. If you want, you can put the eggs and spawning surface into a large jar full of aquarium water then transfer them to the small tank.

After about a month, you may need a larger grow out tank. In some locations, used aquariums are for sale at bargain prices.

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2 years ago #7
shea
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well the move went well been couple of hours and all still moving as much as before. So more visible now also. Can see there eyes tails and yoke sacks

Yeah i also have 25G tank a 80G display tank ( will have to move the current fish in them on)

Thanks for your help

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2 years ago #8
angela c
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HI John. I have a 75 gallon tank with 2 angel fish. They just had babies that i wasnt aware of. I seen them swimming in a corner but the parents were eating them so i got a breader net and but the babies in it. Should i have seperated them? Will they bread again? What do i do from here can u please help me.

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5 months ago #9
Wiilia sheppard
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Not a good idea, I did this and they all died, but the water was not the same as the tank the had hatched in.

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5 months ago #10
nyleve
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Wiilia, this post is over two years old, I think the Angels are pretty much grown up now.
You can tell the date of the last post by looking in the upper right had corner of the response.
Posting on old threads is not only very confusing but it also pushed newer and more urgent questions down the list where they can be missed and thus not answered.
Thank you!

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5 months ago #11
johnarthur
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If they decide to, angelfish can spawn once every two weeks. Some will eat their eggs or fry to protect them from perceived predators. For their wild ancestors, this is a reasonable instinct, because the Amazon basin is filled with predators, and its better for species survival if the parents, not the predators, benefit from the nutrition of eating eggs or fry. Aquarium fish retain most of the instinctive behaviors and environmental needs of their wild ancestors even when they are no longer critical to species survival.

Angelfish spawning has unpredictable outcomes, so commercial operations remove the eggs and raise them by hand. Careful control of all the variables results in a high percentage of the eggs producing sellable angelfish. This may not be the best alternative for a hobbyist, because selling juvenile angelfish is lucrative primarily for commercial operations with established and very large volume customers.

For hobbyists, the payoff is in witnessing the occasional successful spawn and watching a small sphere grow into large angelfish. Parental care, when it happens, can be remarkable, and it's emotionally difficult to sell mature angelfish to local aquarium shops for a fraction of their value in store credits. Giving, trading or selling them to aquarium keeping friends is much more rewarding.

I guess the point is let nature work in its own way, and don't expect great financial rewards for just observing.

Probably this is an old thread with a recent posting, but the question is worth answering. Knowing old things quickly fade into oblivion does not always solicit a positive feeling from those of us experiencing advanced years.

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5 months ago #12
Steve
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Wiilia - Thank you for that, i wll avoid this?

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