3 years ago #1
Kpmakker
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Can I treat fin rot with medication and aquarium salt in an aquarium with live plants?

My intention is to have Discus in a planted aquarium.

I cycled my 60G aquarium about 2 months ago(fishless cycling). After a major water change and waiting for 2 weeks more after that, I added 18 tetras, 2 corys, 2 Swords and 1 beautiful Wendtii. Two days later, I found 2 Tetras dead and today I found one Cory dead as well. I noticed the tails of the Tetras with tail rot so I did a 1/2 tank water change, added the only medication I had available (Lifeguard All-in-one treatment)and some aquarium salt. I cant turn on the filters because they have carbon inside the pads and the medication will be removed. I am afraid the plants will suffer with this treatment...

Please somebody help!

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3 years ago #2
Ebrahim
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hi

Is the carbon removable?if it is, remove it and run the filters.how did you acclimate your fish?moving stress and inapropriate acclimation can kill fish.
The easiest way to treat finrot is daily water changes for small cases.if you feel it nesesary you can treat with an antibiotic.
However if the fins have like fuzzy stuff on them, then the fin rot is caused by a fungus and an appropriate fungacide must be used instead.

Salt wont hurt your plants but it it isnt easily removed.you see salt doesnt evaporate with water so over time the salt concentrations will increase.you will have manualy remove it with water changes

Good luck and please keep us informed

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3 years ago #3
Kpmakker
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Thank you Ace!

I believe the acclimation process has to do with too as I just lost 2 more Tetras today and they didn't have anything on their tails...

I tested the water and the PH is sky high (7.6)!!! I will try to do more water change today and turn on the filters as you mentioned, without the pads with carbon. I just found out I was using my RO System the other way around (taking the bad water instead of the pure one and filling the aquarium)and I dont think that helped with the PH problem either!

It is being the first time I loose so many fish and right now I am trying my best to understand why so it doesn't happen again...

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3 years ago #4
Jase
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Can you do an all-paremeter water test for PH, Ammonia, Nitrite and Nitrates and reply back with your results here please?

I'm thinking that a little salt as a tonic won't harm, but I would probably consider having a little tank for hospital cases... and.. quarantining incoming fish for a period aswell so you can have a half-way house system at all times when you are not treating sick fish. Handy for preventing sickness from entering your main aquarium because you can check on fish for much longer before they become full residents.

Sounds like a bit of messing around, but once you've got that kind of setup, you can do so much more for treating individual fish or an entire species if for example you get a species wide disease breakout.

I'm using a 15 litre tank for just this purpose, and have had great results.

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3 years ago #5
KJP
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Hi,

check the link please and describe how the fins look like. http://www.myaquariumclub.com/how-to-recognize-and- treat-disease-in-fish-what-is-wrong-with-my-fish- 477.html

In my opinion salt will affect plants and I would not recommend to salt treat planted tank. Salt is actually quite tricky to use, so maybe better use antibacterial treatment if you have fin rot.

Filters have to run 24/7 in aquaria so remove carbon cartridge as already advised. Q-tank - quarantine/hospital tank is a good idea, for any fish/invertebrates to observe before introducing them to the big tank, also for plants.

RO water is not recommended for freshwater tanks, RO water has no ions, so no buffers to keep pH balanced, it will swing constantly and uncontrollably, and it will affect you fishes health and immune system. RO water is used for marine set-ups but it is then of course buffered with sea-salt.

Also it is always better to do more frequent and smaller water volume changes then one massive one. What are the water parameters - ammonia, nitrite and nitrate? You might have introduced too many fish at once so you overloaded the bacteria responsible for nitrogen cycle.

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3 years ago #6
Kpmakker
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Thank you guys!

I guess I did go a little overboard with adding so many fish at the same time... I can see at least 2 with tail shredding and 2 more with some very tiny white dots.
I believe I should treat all at the same time now and follow the QT tank rule going forward. I will stop using the RO system for my fresh water and leave it just for the salt water aquarium(never imagined it would affect the PH so much!).

Water parameters are:

PH - 7.8
Ammonia - 0
Nitrite - 0
Nitrate - a little less than 5 after water change

Thanks for all your help!!!

Kelly

BTW- I can see one more is about to die...

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3 years ago #7
Jase
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which fish are the white dots on them? how big are the white dots and are they like a sprinkling of tiny dots all over the fish? or are they in one particular area?

Outside of the finrot you originally posted about, the white dots i think needs the greater attention.

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3 years ago #8
Kpmakker
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Oh Jase... I just lost one more Tetra and now my cory is dying... It is happening so fast!

The curious fact is that none of the ones dying had those symptoms... I don't know what to do...

The little white (very tiny) dots are mainly on the tail and fins and I don't know if it is normal but a couple of the Tetras are swimming kind of chasing the other ones.

At this point I don't even know if there is any treatment I can pursue.

Should I do another water change?

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3 years ago #9
Jase
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The tetra's tend to stop swimming with the shoal and distance as much as they can when they have issues.

I've recently dealt with a bout of Neon Tetra Disease in my 2nd aquarium and i lost 7 out of my 9 neons and one of my other fish at first looked like it had issues.

I diluted my water with a part water change every other day and doing my water changes seemed to help. It got me used to seeing fish loss though, and i was extremly upset with the first ones, but more used to it after the 5th or 6th.

Its not nice, but sometimes its just a fact of fishkeeping that you will get some diseases even in the cleanest tanks.

Do a quick search for 'ICH' (white spot).. look for some pictures, does this match what you see in your fish? Its quite distinctive when you see it. If it is indeed ich then there are treatments, including increasing the temp in your aquarium too, but whichever route you go down treating ich, just make sure the dose takes into account neon tetra's.

Failing that, don't rule out Neon Tetra disease.. again this has some white spotting, but also has a number of other symptoms too.

I know this can seem bad, but Neon Tetra's are not the hardiest of fish, and tend to be the first to show signs of trouble.

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3 years ago #10
Kpmakker
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I appreciate you sharing your experiences with me... I have 3 other tanks and this is the very first one to give me this type of trouble. As you said, I need to get used to it. I will make a run to the pet shop to buy Melafix and try the treatment. Hopefully I will get things sorted out.

Thank you so much!

Kelly

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