Can mollies & guppies mate??

2 years ago #1
butterfly angel
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This might be a stupid question but i must know lol! Well more can they have babies together, cause my boy guppies are trying their hardest to do my girl mollies lol!

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2 years ago #2
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yes, they are both poecilia.

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2 years ago #3
Christi
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Correct - mollies and guppies can cross. If a male molly successfully impregnates a female guppy it can kill the female. If you choose to hybridize (not a good idea) best to keep it male guppy and female molly.

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2 years ago #4
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dachshund/great danes are funny looking, too, especially as fish.

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2 years ago #5
Christi
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Now that would be awkward.

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2 years ago #6
butterfly angel
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Thank you Well now i may know where the babies with the yellow heads & black bodies came from lol!

I believe all my guppies are male. How can you tell the females from the males?

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2 years ago #7
Christi
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Male guppies generally have fancier and brighter colored finnage than the females.

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2 years ago #8
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you can't with fry. The female adults are gray or brown and usually do not have any fin color, but some high end breeds can. The males have all the color.

Butterfly, you have to get this tank under control before something bad happens and a disease causes really bad problems. Full of livebearers, there will be, literally, a potential for thousands of fish in a few months.

Look at this, post 5:
http://www.myaquariumclub.com/a-neighbour-gave-my-daughter-a-female-guppy-a-month-ago-and-on-the-very-fir...-18248217.html#182796

Please!

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2 years ago #9
butterfly angel
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Most of the fry get eating, I have had had 3 females give birth n me nor my son can find but 5 babies. When my friend gets back in a month she's going to take the babies for her daughter N the only babies i am going to keep are the very first two that made it.

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2 years ago #10
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OK. Keep watching things, fry appear out of nowhere, there will be many more in a month.

Keep posting!

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2 years ago #11
butterfly angel
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Oh n i did read the link thanx Well my guppies are super colorful n pretty so i guess their male then. I really love the ones with the split fins so pretty

I was trying to wait till the fry are big enough so they won't get eating when i get ride of them, Also hopping my mom finds a cheap tank set up soon cause she wants some too.

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1 year ago #12
fishloverr
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I have a similar case. I did not know they could cross until i saw the guppies going after my mollies

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1 year ago #13
NavigatorBlack
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I have kept mollies and guppies together for years, with no successful matings. Sure, they tried. They will try with a plant.
There are documented crossings, but it is rare. Word is that if the male is a molly, the guppy dies dropping the fry.
And the young are sterile.
If you look online (google guppy molly crosses) there aren't even many photos.

There is a huge difference between a species and a breed. People tend to think crossing species is easy. It only works if the species are the result of isolation - a population of a species gets cut off and through evolution drifts genetically into a slightly different form. If we put it together with a related species that it would never meet in nature, but that is still close, young may result. Usually, the matings aren't casual and you have to give the fish no other choices.
If the species are still close, there may even be fertile fry. That's how the swords, platys and variatus in the hobby ended up as mutts, as did all the mollies (which can be a mix of many species that don't meet in nature).

The usual barrier, if it isn't DNA, is the shape of the male's sex organ, the gonopodium. They have important differences in shape, and often have small hooklike structures on them. They rarely succeed in actually mating with differently shaped females, for all their trying.

Bad breeding practices have made a lot of beautiful rainbowfish unavailable - these fish (recently evolved according to their DNA) will often easily cross, and fishfarms and slack hobbyists threw them together to "improve" them and ended up with washed out hybrids mixed in with their wild caught species. In very little time, we ended up with a lot of blah rainbows that all sort of look alike, and we only have photos to see their original magnificence.

Recent Blog Post: Quarantine
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1 year ago #14
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Lots of things are claimed, there are plenty of muppy/moppy (never seen a golly/gully, though ) references and vids online, even sellers. I've been tempted to buy some moppies just to see what the heck they are, but haven't.

The Navigator brings up some great points; if these crosses, though genetically possible, were of any interest, it would seem they'd be commonplace and the "technical" difficulties solved long ago. A raft alongside a battleship comes to mind. I don't think they exist commercially in any number, but could be wrong.

We have some cortezi swords from the Xiphophorus Genetic Stock Center that have never gotten more than an inch long. Perfect genes, even mapped, tiny fish, just their natural variation. Some of their siblings are perfect cortezi's, huge, beautiful, fast and mean, just like some turn out.

There are some really cute "teapot" platies available that are just small platies; to the best of my knowledge small ones were selectively bred to make these, some of my platy drops have produced a few of these little guys and they're very nice. I should have bred them.

We also have many "pure" wild livebearers from tiny endlers and pictas to gigantic Sailfin Mollies and Mayae Swords and lots of very colorful commercial strains and it seems that the variation attainable in ordinary crosses is almost endless, making weird combinations like guppy/molly or even endler/molly ("Oh yeah, they exist!" Not!) kind of pointless, but to each their own.

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9 months ago #15
daniyal
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By the fins males have pointy ones when females have round ones

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