5 years ago #1
JessMutter
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We are making our 55 gal. a community tank. Was looking at Discus but changed my mind once I realized how expensive they really are. So now I am into Angels. We got two small (quarter size) angels, a glass cat and half dozen White Clouds, which my kids (age 6 and 9) have really been enjoying. Local fish inventories are down a bit b/c of the loss from last month's freeze here in FL, but I will be looking to add a few more Angels, maybe neons and some sort of Barbs or Loaches, plus maybe a few live plants- any suggestions? We have some rocks, silk plants and good filtration (canister filter).

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5 years ago #2
angela_brown
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I hate to rain on your parade... and I really try to be positive... but... neons aren't exactly compatible with Angels... If you have baby angels... that'll work, but as the Angels grow... The neons may end up as lunch! So... As many of us aquarium junkies end up.. you may end up getting some more tanks 8)

I was thinking that White Clouds are cooler water fish than Angels... but I would have to check on that.

Live plants... I like Vals and Swords...

Good Luck with your new endevour!

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5 years ago #3
achintya
Wiz
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if money is not a problem you may keep discus fish, i can help you out for keeping discus fish...more for details i have a blog about discus fish,you can get this link at my signature.
for the compatible fish with angels i will recommend you to keep tetra sp. like neon and cardinal tetra. and clown loach...
for plants i'll advice you to keep amazon,anacharis,anubias sp.....

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5 years ago #4
johnarthur
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Angelfish need a water temperature of about 82, and White Clouds need much cooler water. Although some pet shops sell angelfish for community tanks, they are compatible with few other species. Each mature angelfish needs about ten gallons of aquarium space, and they grow large and become aggressive. Angelfish are also somewhat delicate and demanding. They're one of my favorite aquarium fish species but are probably not the best choice for a beginning aquarist.

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5 years ago #5
JessMutter
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Thanks for the answers, guys. I've added 3 more small angels for a total of five. Also added three rosy barbs and an Arrow plant. Should mention we've had have several pieces of wood in the tank, I see Angels like that. The pet store tech told me the same thing- they may eat the neons as they get bigger. C'est la Vie! We have had a bunch of Oscars over the years, we've also raised African Cichlids, had a breeder tank for a few years & got to 3rd and 4th generations of fish- which was fun- so I've seen the "eat or be eaten" cycle many times.
Something really cool that happened was I put the three new guys in, and they were on the opposite side from the two I got yesterday. For 20 min they were not aware of each other. Then the new group of three drifted over and it was quite amusing to see them all kind of twitching and checking each other out- like a bunch of cats.
Angels are delicate? I was under the impression they were kind of hardy fish. Both pet stores told me no heater is needed. We live in central FL and the house is always bet. 74-84 degrees. I am not particularly interested in breeding them at this point. That being said, it looks like one of the White Clouds is pregnant.... hmm...

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5 years ago #6
johnarthur
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If the aquarium water temperature swings between 74 and 84, it will put too much stress on the fish. Most aquarium fish can tolerate a wide range of water parameters, but if they don't have close to ideal conditions they will not be healthy. This is especially true of angelfish. It's just an opinion, but i think the aquarium should have a heater.

I apologise for assuming you were new to the hobby. Since you have already kept Cichlids, you must have a good idea of how adult angelfish will behave. The juveniles will probably be fine for a few months, but be aware that all the twitching is part of their courtship ritual.

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5 years ago #7
JessMutter
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OK, you've convinced me- We have a heater I'll hook up. We have some cold weather coming and the house temp will be in the low 70's.
What kind of thermometer do you recommend? I'll have to get one before I hook up the heater. Our old thermometer was the kind you stick on the glass and seemed to be OK. Is the recommended temp 82?
We found a couple more small pieces of anchored wood we're putting in the tank.. Also found a few more plastic plants, the tank is looking more well-planted, with several rocky caves.
Yes, African cichlids are fun, it is interesting to watch their "society". Sounds like the angels are a lot like them, I'm looking forward to seeing them grow & their personalities... I've already noticed some differences there.
One more question: I was out of Stress Coat when I added the new guys, but did put Aquarisol in the water. I swear by that stuff. Do you think I'll need anything else?
I will send pix sometime-
Jessie

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5 years ago #8
johnarthur
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I just use those stick on thermometers, because the suction cups on the glass ones don't work very long. For five bucks or so you can get a digital thermometer that's more accurate; you can take it from one aquarium to another to make sure the stick-ons are working. Most angelfish keepers try to keep their water around 80 or 82.

As for water conditioners, there are several good ones on the market. I use Stress Coat because it works well and has no strong chemical odors like some other conditioners. Besides, i buy it by the gallon from an on-line store. Back in the stone age when i got my first aquarium, all the fish grew sick, so i added just about every remedy on the market. The only thing it worked on was my small-money billfold. Then sometime between getting puberty and raising a couple of daughters it started to dawn on me that aquarium water is chemically and biologically complex and that successful aquarium keeping is more about getting the right balance and less about changing natural processes by the use of chemical bludgeons. Thus my bias against medicating.

Many public water systems contain chloramines (compounds of chlorine and ammonia) so they don't lose all their chlorine at the end of a long delivery network. Most water conditioners on the market now neutralise chloramines. To take care of the copper in a mystery snail aquarium, i add some Rid Metals from Kordon.

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5 years ago #9
JessMutter
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I agree, sometimes "less is more" as far a chemicals. We use Clor-out which removes the cloramine- (like you said) Good filtration seems to mean a lot..
OK found a regular little clip-on thermometer and set the heater for 82. The water measured 77 (even though the house temp is 71- go figure) before I even turned it on. I'm watching the temp tonight to make sure it doesn't get too hot. How often do you rec. a partial water change in a 55 gal community tank (and how much)?
I started w/ a 10 gallon as a kid and had all kinds of fish- figured things out by trial and error. My kids will benefit from my experiance, lol. They like the tank but I am the one who sits in front and watches the fish- very relaxing you know.
Mystery snails- are those are the ones that multiply like crazy?

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5 years ago #10
johnarthur
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The usual recommended partial water change is 20 or 25 percent a week. If the aquarium is densely populated and if there is any over feeding, more frequent water changes are needed. A more balanced setup may be good for two or even three weeks, but the weekly partial water changes are more likely to result in optimum conditions.

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