3 years ago #1
Unlucky
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I have a 33 gallon tank with 2 dalmation mollies, a beta, 4 guppies, 4 glass catfish, 2 cory catfish, and a plecostomus. I've only had this tank since the beginning of January and it originally had the beta, 3 guppies, 2 mollies, and 4 glass catfish. One guppy died about two weeks ago from what looked like another fish attack. Tho it showed no previous signs of stress or disease. Other than that hey all did fine together until about 4 days ago when I bought a plecostomus,2 more guppies, and 3 cory catfish. I added them all to the tank without putting them in a quarantine tank first (I don't have one available). About two days later one of the cory catfish showed signs of what I thought was ich. It was laying lazily on the ground and white spots on its fins. First I changed the water like I normally do and tested it later that day and nitrate/nitrite/ph levels, etc, were all good. I bought some medicine to treat ich and added it as I was instructed. The next day the catfish died, but all the fish were continuing to do great. Later that day when I came back home one of the mollies started acting similar to the catfish. The molly is breathing hard and clamping its fins and laying at the bottom of the tank. I moved him to a breeder container where he cant be bothered by the other fish. I have a feeling he's going to die like the catfish did tho. Can some one tell me what might be going on with my fish now?

Posted on Tropical Fish
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3 years ago #2
jlk
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What are your exact readings (ppm) for ammonia, nitrite, nitrate & ph? What are you using to test (liquid or strips)? Did you cycle the tank before adding fish? Some more info will help!

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3 years ago #3
Unlucky
Guest

I use just a simple test strip to test the Ph, alkalinity, nitrates, nitrites, and water hardness. I dont remember the exact levels but my dad looked them over and said all the levels were good but the ph and alkalinity were a little high. I have nothing for test for ammonia but I've changed the water twice this week. I didn't do anything differently to the tank before I added them. I just let them acclimate in the bags they came in and eventually released them in there. The male Molly died last night. And now it looks like the beta has small white flecks and some fin damage and is acting a little lazy. Though he's not breathing hard and he's still eating and swimming. All the other fish act fine.

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3 years ago #4
johnarthur
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Ammonia is naturally produced by fish respiration and digestion as well as uneaten food. If it does not measure zero, the nitrogen cycle is not working. This in turn means the fish will have weakened immune systems and will likely be invaded by diseases and parasites.

Try to feed no more than the fish actually eat in a couple of minutes, and change about 25 percent of the water every few days. Use a good tap water conditioner, leave the fish in the aquarium, and never change all of the water at one time.

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3 years ago #5
Unlucky
Guest

Is it possible that if one fish is being picked on by another fish that it can develope white specs from injury and act sluggish/ clamp its fins/ breathe hard and eventually die? I've never had ammonia problems before and haven't changed what I do to maintain the tank. Partial water changes, conditioned tap water, regular temperature around 78 degrees. If the new fish did bring a disease or parasite I can't figure out what kind it is. It started with the Cory catfish. I only noticed odd symptoms the day before it died. It had white spots, crashed at the bottom and breathed heavey. Then I noticed the Molly breathing heavy and crashing at the bottom and i think I saw a couple white specs (not sure because he's white in color). Next day he died. Now I see white specs on my beta but he's not breathing heavy or crashing. Does this sound like a disease? A parasite? Ammonia poisoning? Maybe a bullying fish?

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3 years ago #6
jlk
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Does the white spots look like specks of sand sprinkled on them? If so, then its likely ich. Without a a means to test your ammonia levels, its possible that there may be an ammonia issue as well.

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3 years ago #7
johnarthur
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Even healthy aquariums contain the inactive seeds or spores of parasites and diseases. A healthy fish with a robust immune system can easily withstand these things. When toxic nitrogen compounds like ammonia and nitrite get into the aquarium, fish's immune systems shut down and they get sick.

An over crowded aquarium or one with significant amounts of uneaten food or decaying organic matter will likely contain toxic nitrogen compounds. Aggression in an aquarium sometimes happens when there are too many fish or incompatible species.

The little white spots could be the very common ich parasite. Because of its lifecycle, treatment for the ich parasite usually lasts two weeks or more.

Just to be sure you understand the workings of the nitrogen cycle, please click this link:
http://www.myaquariumclub.com/the-nitrogen-cycle-for- beginners-358.html

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3 years ago #8
Unlucky
Guest

Thank you for the help! I'm going to buy a liquid test kit to check out the tanks nitrate nitrite and ammonia levels. Maybe then I will figure out what's going on if there's ammonia problems. Thanks again!

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3 years ago #9
tanya
Platinum Member
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it may take more then one treatment to cure the ick and some fish who r to weak from the disease wont survive after u add the meds. i always advise people to use a sick tank before u put any fish in an tank

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3 years ago #10
Unlucky
Guest

So I've come to the conclusion that they have velvet disease. I shined a bright light over their bodies and i can see a film of gold dust covering them/ parts of them. The beta has it the worse. Covered in gold film and the white spotsim noticing another Cory catfish getting weaker. What can i do to help cure them??? So far, yesterday I did about a 50% water changed and added mardel copper safe treatment and took out my carbon filter. What else can i do?

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3 years ago #11
jlk
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The copper product is effective against velvet & many other diseases. You will also want to black out the tank for atleast 7 days- no lights & wrap something dark around the outside to limit natual light from entering the tank. You will need to keep the water healthy- without healthy water the meds are not effective.

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3 years ago #12
johnarthur
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Have you tested for ammonia and nitrite? Medications do not work or are less effective if the aquarium contains either of those toxic nitrogen compounds.

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3 years ago #13
Unlucky
Guest

I need a better water testing method the strips i use don't check for ammonia but nitrates and nitrites were good. But I'm going to get a liquid test kit for better results on everything.

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3 years ago #14
johnarthur
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Most of the ammonia test kits have a sample tube, liquid reagent and color comparison chart; they cost around $10.00. Recently, Tetra started selling a dip strip type test that measures ammonia.

Probably none of the water test kits sold for the aquarium hobby are precise enough for use in a chemical lab. Price and accuracy, however, are suitable for testing aquarium water.

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1 year ago #15
thomas
Guest

Depending on the ich treatment you used it may have killed ur cats because on the api super ich cure it says maybe harmful to scaless fish.

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