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6 years ago#1
Suzer62
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Hello, I have a problem with a relatively new tank. It's all matured/cycled, but I've noticed the next morning, after I've fed the fish that there's a fuzzy whitish fungus (I think that's what it is) all around the food pellet, or piece of shrimp that I've fed them. The fish themselves are fine, no problems at all. My aquarium plants seem fine too. It's just that this fuzzy white stuff seems to encompass the food and surely that's not right. Does anyone know what this is, and how I can treat it? Any help is greatly appreciated. Thank you.

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6 years ago#2
Megham
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Hi, it sounds like the food you fed them has spoiled. If the fish do not eat it very soon, it will fungus and spoil before long just like you described. I recommend that you not feed them more than they can eat in 2 or 3 minutes. Spoiled food can quickly hurt your water quality and this will harm your fish as well. I recommend that you siphon out the spoiled food and do a 30-50 percent water change.

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6 years ago#3
johnarthur
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Probably it just means that you fed the fish too much. If there is only a small amount of spoiled food, you can use a turkey baster to suck it out. However, if there is much of a buildup, you need to do a partial water change and make sure to get all the gunk off the bottom. A check for ammonia may also be in order.

If the fish are healthy, they will always act hungry. They should be fed a variety of quality foods twice a day but no more than they can eat in a couple of minutes. In addition, they can go without food for more than a week. Live plants and regular, partial water changes will help compensate for over feeding.

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6 years ago#4
johnarthur
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Sorry if that last post just repeated what Megan said. We were probably writing responses at the same time.

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6 years ago#5
Suzer62
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Yeah but I'm concerned because it's not one particular food, it's anything that is food-like the goes to the bottom. In my other tanks if there is any food left the next day there's no fungus. Even if I feed the same food, I don't understand why it's just leftover food in the one tank, but it's fungal in the other?? Should I do a 50% water change if the tank is not that old and hasn't had any water changes yet? The water is clear. I just have the feeling there's something else going on with that tank.

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6 years ago#6
Kurbee3
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The same thing happened in my tank. I had that stuff that floats at the top. I just scooped out that food they didn't eat right away and threw it out so that none of it went to the bottom.

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6 years ago#7
johnarthur
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The aquarium definitely needs a partial water change. It probably has a bacterial buildup, and not all bacteria are good. Clear water is a good sign, but it's not the only indication of a healthy aquarium. It could have ammonia or other dangerous compounds and still be clear. If you have time, you might try a 20 percent water change each day for two or three days. A 50 percent water change could change temperature or other water parameters too quickly. Most fish can tolerate less than ideal water parameters but not rapid changes. After things are back to normal, do a 15 or 20 percent water change every week, and avoid over feeding.

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6 years ago#8
jesskozzy
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this happens to me too all the time, just take a tube from the air pump ( make sure its pretty long ) and put one end of it into the tank, and with the other end suck really quickly and then hurry and put it into a bucket or milk gallon or container of some sort. use that to siphon out all the yucky stuff, and it also it giving you a water change too. then add new water with conditioner and your all set :] i do this daily.

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6 years ago#9
johnarthur
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You can buy a syphon hose with a large diameter uptake end. This lets you clean the gravel without sucking it through the hose. You can also buy syphon starters in case you don't like drinking aquarium water. If you have lots of aquariums, one of the maintenance systems like a Python will save lots of time and work.

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6 years ago#10
Kurbee3
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at work we have a syphon with a pump on it also that is part of the tubing. You can manually compress the tubing which works as the pump. They are really inexpensive. It works nice for our turtles because you definitely don't want to be drinking turtle water haha.

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6 years ago#11
johnarthur
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Or aquarium bottom water cootie cocktails

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6 years ago#12
someonewhoneedshel p
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Can the build up of food kill the betta?

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6 years ago#13
Suzer62
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Okay, I did the water change, about 40%, so it will be interesting to see if I still have this problem. I can accept that maybe I put too much food in, although I don't think that was the issue, as I only put a couple of pellets in the bottom for my bottom feeders, but there's still an issue of why fungus would be there in the first place. I've never had anything like that in any of my other tanks, and there are times when the food has been left lying on the bottom and it never gets any fuzzy stuff on it. I can't help thinking that everyone has missed the real issue here. In my opinion, it's not about leftover food, it's about WHY fuzzy white stuff gets onto the food in the first place. *Oh and I've figured how to get over having a change of water temperature, I have an unused heater and I just put the heater into the water I am going to put into the aquarium and heat it up to the temp of the water already in the tank, and voila, it's the same temp!!

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6 years ago#14
johnarthur
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Can the build up of food kill the betta?

YES

The water change amounts that I recommended are fairly conservative, but temperature is not the only water parameter that affects the health of aquarium fish. For example, a rapid change in pH can affect their health. For the small water changes, I just use tap water plus a good water conditioner, and adjust the temperature by feel.

About the fungus: To thrive, it needs food, but it also needs a spore or bacteria to get it started. Since the same foods in other aquariums don't get all fuzzy, the fungus cooties must be coming from your one aquarium. Letting it go for several weeks without a partial water change will for sure promote the buildup of those nasty old fungus cooties. Cootie is, of course, a technical term; I learned it in grade school. If left over food is not the source of the fungus cooties, it could be an accumulation of plant and fish wastes. In any case, the water changes should eliminate the problem. Please let us know if it does.

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6 years ago#15
Suzer62
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Thanks JA, I think you've finally hit the nail on the head, and I agree with you. The tank in question had previously used gravel, and I never cleaned it thinking it would be beneficial for my current usage, and there was alot of plant waste in the gravel, I could see that when I did my water change yesterday, as I used a gravel cleaner at the same time. I appreciate all your help and I will keep you all updated as to what's happening with that tank. Thank you.

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6 years ago#16
johnarthur
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Thank you for putting up with my cootie talk.

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6 years ago#17
angela_brown
Platinum Member
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Well, I hadn't read this post when I posted to the other one... LOL!

So... Go with the flow... Hope your fish gets better!

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4 years ago#18
ta ta
Guest

u r right it is but it is algea

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4 years ago#19
ta ta
Guest

hi

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3 years ago#20
lor lor
Guest

hey, my fish tank has fuzzy white stuff in it and it just goes around and ataches it self to the plants. it looks like fish eggs, but it breaks off and goes everywhere. Now every day of this week one of my fish died. today it was my shark! i am really mad and do not want my 3 reamainig fish to die.what shnould i do? can i treat it? are all of my fish going to die? please help!

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3 years ago#21
johnarthur
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When fish are stressed, they sometimes produce excessive amounts of the slime coat (mucus) which usually protects them from poor quality water and diseases. Water quality issues are common in such cases, so start by changing about 30 percent of the aquarium water. Also syphon any debris from the surface of the substrate. Make sure the replacement water is at about the same temperature as the aquarium water, and use a good water conditioner like Stress Coat.

You may also want to buy a water test kit and check for ammonia and nitrite. Both are naturally occurring toxins that are normally consumed by bacteria associated with the nitrogen cycle. If either is present in any amount, you will need to change 20 or 25 percent of the water every day for several days. If you would like to read more about the nitrogen cycle, click on the TOP ARTICLES list at the top left of the page.

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3 years ago#22
Dawn
Guest

Im havin the same white fuz problem and i changed the water did about a 50% water changed filled it up and went back to look at it an hr later and the fuz is comming back im wondering if it would be good to empty the whole tank and clean it all the way out....or just keep changing the water 30%-50% untill its good?

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3 years ago#23
kc
Guest

I use the syphon that attaches to the kitchen sink, I love it.. saves me lots of time and with a bad back, I no longer have to carry heavy buckets of H20,that makes doing what I love a lot easier..

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3 years ago#24
Jase
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Python or the JBL Aqua In/Out?

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3 years ago#25
johnarthur
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Dawn: If you empty the aquarium and clean everything, you will probably also remove all the beneficial bacteria associated with the nitrogen cycle. A series of small, partial water changes is safer. Some aquarists do 50 percent partial water changes, but changing that much water at one time runs the risk of creating sudden changes in water parameters. Those sudden changes can affect fish health.

Fungus problems often happen because of excess nutrients in the water. To avoid over feeding, give the fish no more than they actually eat in a couple of minutes. Sometimes this is tough to do, because healthy fish act hungry most of the time.

Over crowding is another source of excess nutrients. Fast growing plants like hornwort or even duck weed can directly metabolise ammonia and thus help water quality. If you can, avoid using duck weed; it spreads really fast and is nearly impossible to get rid of.

Since you're dealing with natural processes, don't expect anything to work over night. When the aquarium reaches a biological balance and has no excess nutrients, a weekly partial water change of about 25 percent should keep things stable.

PS: If you are comfortable doing so, you're welcome to join our forum.

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3 years ago#26
animal_researcher
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I reccomend you clean out the whole tank. Let me know if it gets better or gets worse.

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3 years ago#27
Jase
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How far is your tank into cycling, was that bit complete? or has it recently finished cycling? Sometimes near the end of a cycle you see white fuzz.. i saw similar myself, but as soon as it arrived, some water changes later they disappeared and i've not seen the stuff since in my own tank.

At worst, do up to 30% water change with 25%-30% of your gravel vacuumed. I certainly didn't do a full tank break-down to cure the problem

What are the rest of your water tests like out of interest? and how well is your filter working? do you maintain your filter aswell as your tank? eg. clean the impeller & impeller houseing and ensure water flow is not blocked in the filter .. this can happen.

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2 years ago#28
jarred
Guest

its all over the fake plants and thats what killed my fish i think it is not spoiled food but fungus

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2 years ago#29
thea
Wiz
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I'm sorry you lost your fish.

What everyone is trying to explain is that fungus does not arise in a tank without something to eat. A clean tank with no excess nutrients will not grow fungus. Excess nutrients are only occuring in your tank if there is leftover food, fish waste or dead plant (or animal)material. Fungus in a tank is a heads up to the aquarium keeper that something is amiss -- and probably ammonia and nitrites are high too -- which are toxic to fish.

The way to cure this is frequent water changes and cleaning (but not too much at a time) to lessen the amount of food the fungus/bacteria has to eat.

So yes, in a way it may have been fungus that killed your fish, but the fungus is there because of the above causes. And the solution is to clear up the cause.

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2 years ago#30
Avery Milona
Guest

The fuzzy white fungus is the left over food that got mollded.I had the same problem.you have to take out all of the stuff in your fish tank even the fish.then clean the fungus and exchange the water.put the fish back in the water once the water is warm/cold enough for them.I hope this helps you!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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