Guppies & Albino Cory's in same tank

Newbies avatar
4 years ago #1
Newbies
Fresh Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 12
Votes: 1

Hi, I have these two types of fishes together in a 20 gallon tank. I added salt about a month ago, because my guppies were dying, but I am not sure if it is okay for my albino cory's.

Does anyone know if the cory's will be okay with salt?

Posted on Tropical Fish
Answer
Goldibug avatar
4 years ago #2
Goldibug
Master
Blogs: 2
Forum: 3,465
Votes: 181

The average dosing of salt used to medicate the tank shouldn't affect the cories at all. I know many sites say cories can't handle it but I've heard from numerous other fish owners that their corydora were just fine.

Reply
johnarthur avatar
4 years ago #3
johnarthur
Blogs: 115
Forum: 29,041
Votes: 1,512

Dead fish are usually the result of water quality issues, and salt will not compensate for lack of a working nitrogen cycle or good aquarium management. In addition, salt has some rather profound effects on animals adapted over generations to live in freshwater. It's often used as a medication for certain maladies, but salt is not a cure all to be used casually.

Have you checked water parameters recently? They should be appropriate for the species you are keeping, and toxic nitrogen compounds should be controlled. For example, ammonia and nitrite must measure zero, and nitrate concentration should be less than 40 ppm.

To help maintain a safe biological balance, feed no more than the fish actually eat in a couple of minutes, and change 20 or 25 percent of the water every week. If toxic nitrogen compounds are not controlled, partial water changes should be every other day.

Reply
Newbies avatar
4 years ago #4
Newbies
Fresh Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 12
Votes: 1

Hi John Arthur,

My parameters
ammonia is 0.25
Nitrate is 0
Ph 7.4
Nitrite 0

I am a little frustrated, these have been my water parameters since May 23 (except the Ph has dropped from 7.6).

Around May 23, my fish started dying here is my link to my original post then:
http://www.myaquariumclub.com/fish-dropping-dead-10050418.html

Now, I have 3 Guppies, and 4 albino cory's, 1 otocinclus.
I can't seem to get my tank to cycle. I have been changing the water every 2-3 days to get rid of the ammonia consistently since then, yet I have not reached 0 levels.

Am I doing something wrong?

About 4-5 years ago I bought the tank, and I had Ciclids, but they passed. I cleaned the tank up, used all the same equipment (even the stuff in the filter - but clean) and restarted this tank middle of April 2012.

Is there a reason my tank is yet to cycle? Do I need to buy the activating carbon, and media filter?

Finally, because my fish started dying, and started adding salt, do you suggest I quit this habit all together, and just ensure healthy water levels?

Thanks for your help,
Newbies

Reply
johnarthur avatar
4 years ago #5
johnarthur
Blogs: 115
Forum: 29,041
Votes: 1,512

Activated carbon will absorb microscopic particles and minerals, but it will not have much effect on the cycling process. In a few weeks, the microscopic pores in activated carbon will be filled, thus rendering the charcoal filter ineffective.

Establishing a nitrogen cycle involves growing three different bacteria colonies in sequence. Partial water changes are necessary to protect the fish, but they also limit the nutrients (toxic nitrogen compounds) available to feed the nitrogen cycle bacteria.
http://www.myaquariumclub.com/the-nitrogen-cycle-for-beginners-358.html

A nitrogen cycle develops faster in an aquarium without fish and without partial water changes. With fish in the aquarium, the best thing is a 20 or 25 percent partial water change every two or three days. The replacement water should be treated with something like Stress Coat, which temporarily neutralises ammonia.

The nitrogen cycle is functioning when ammonia and nitrite always measure zero and nitrate is below 40 ppm. In a large aquarium this process may require more than a month. Smaller aquariums with fish need only a few weeks.

Reply
Newbies avatar
4 years ago #6
Newbies
Fresh Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 12
Votes: 1

I read your article before, and it really helped me understand the cycle (especially the diagram).

what do you recommend is the best filtration?

I will look into getting a stress coat thing-a-magig.

Do you recommend the oxygen pump thing?

I originally bought a lot of plants, but they have all died, so I have resorted to fake plants, and decided I need to keep my fish alive and well first, before I try to keep plants as well.

Reply
shrimpy avatar
4 years ago #7
shrimpy
Platinum Member
Blogs: 1
Forum: 328
Votes: 20

I would suggest a canister filter because they are really powerful and low maintenance. I wouldn't reccomebd the air pump because the airs tones can wear out over time. Instead I would go with a power head. It is a little more expensive but it never wears out and it gives more airation

Reply
By entering this site you declare you read and agreed to its Terms, Rules & Privacy and you understand that your use of the site's content is made at your own risk and responsibility.
Copyright © 2006 - 2016 My Aquarium Club