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3 years ago #1
shrimpy
Guest

i have two ghost shrimp that have little green eggs inside them. what do i do to hatch them and are they fertal. if so do you put them in a breeding chamber. and how do you tell the sex of the shrimp?

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3 years ago #2
southern creature
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Hey there shrimpy.

Sexing these guys is best done by observing that the males are smaller than females and the females carry the eggs.

Yes they will be fertile! To hatch them out, take the egg laden females and put them into a spererate tank. Make sure the new tank has plenty of plants and detritus (rotting leaves etc) on the botton of the tank. The newly hatched shrimp will feed on rotting plants, tiny organisms living that are living on the plants and even some finely crushed flake food.
Once the females no longer have eggs or hatched babies hanging on them, put them back into the main tank.

I wouldn't recomend a "breeding chamber", but rather a small aquarium with it's own air supply. Shrimp are easily affected by pollutants and a bigger space with frequent water changes will increase their chance of survival.

Hope this helps and good luck mate.

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3 years ago #3
shrimpy
Guest

thanks. i will put them in my 1.5 gallon breeding tank after my mollie fry get bigger btw if i put them in there now will the shrimp eat the fry?

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3 years ago #4
southern creature
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Yes they can do, if the fry are small enough. Ghost/glass shrimp are exellent fish catchers.

How big are the fry atm?

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3 years ago #5
shrimpy
Guest

not big btw how do u breed snails

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3 years ago #6
johnarthur
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The snails usually take care of that job without help or encouragement from the aquarist. Mystery snails, however, need a full hood and about two inches of space between the water surface and the hood. They most often lay a pod of eggs on a moist, horizontal surface.

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3 years ago #7
Tez
Junior Member
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I know this is an old post but I've been looking something simular as I have just bought some ghost shrimp and some came pregnant.
http://www.fishforums.com/forum/invertebrates/17996- breeding-ghost-shrimp-palaeomonetes-patulous.html

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3 years ago #8
johnarthur
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Female shrimp carry and hatch their eggs. All you need to do is provide a safe, healthy environment.

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3 years ago #9
agent
Guest

to breed mystery snails you need to have about 6 of them to ensure you have enough so they will breed at least once. Keep your water the same tempreture as your shrimp live in. The snails will help clean alage.

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2 years ago #10
suylong
Guest

I need not breed them, just last week found out I have few juvenile ghost shrimps in my 66 gallons tank. they mated and breeded themself, even though the sutvival rate is low, but good enough in a few months time I will have lots them. provide them with dense of plants to hide and feed on, they will do there natural multiplication.

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1 year ago #11
Linden Eppolito
Guest

I have a female ghost shrimp and she layed some eggs two weeks ago . How long until the eggs hatch into little ghost shrimp hatchlings?

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1 year ago #12
cheychey
Guest

Will the mother eat her eggs!

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1 year ago #13
shannon
Guest

Can a ghost shrimp live with out oxygen and air bubbles

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12 months ago #14
me
Guest

no, but will eat the larva once they detatch

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10 months ago #15
TropicalKass
Fresh Member
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I just bought some already hatched baby brine shrimp off of amazon.com that you can feed the baby ghost shrimp. It was about $8 shipping and everything. I just got mine today!

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8 months ago #16
victoria
Guest

hi there. this is my first time having gosh shrimp. i did put the pregnant shirmp in the breeder box. however the pregnant shirmp Shell and the eggs was detached from that pregnat shrimp. i dont know why, and there wasn't any baby shrimp neither. can you give me some ideas what was happening? thank for your advice. victoria

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7 months ago #17
Joe H
Silver Member
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Ghost shrimps dont breed like regular shrimps they need brackish water to have babies. the have little pollips that need the brackish water

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7 months ago #18
Fins2MyHeart
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No that's Amano shrimp. Amano shrimp have larva that only hatch in brackish and once they reach a certain age then thy go to fresh water.

Sometimes ghost shrimp can have infertile eggs or an miscarriage in al of there babies this is usually caused by stress so y should move the pregnant ghost shrimp ASAP to the baby tank so she will be less stressed when the time comes


Plz post the ret I it questions on a different thread!

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7 months ago #19
Joe H
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Everyone I talk to that raises shrimp say that ghost shrimp need brackish water thats why they dont breed in regular aquariums. I have never had any egg up in any of mine and I have no problems raising any other shrimps

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7 months ago #20
Fins2MyHeart
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Ghost shrimps are fresh water the reason they may not be breeding may include:

1. You have all makes or vice versa

2. They conditions may not be right (Aggressive fish, Bad water quality, too cold,

3. They only breed in freshwater putting them in salt water will kill them

4. Mother/Other fish have been eating the baby's

And ghost shrimp don't lay eggs they grow inside the female then when they are ready she kinda "Kicks" them out of her and the shrimples then float kinda because they army yet strong enough to swim so they go wherever the current goes

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7 months ago #21
Fins2MyHeart
Champion
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She looks like this when ready

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7 months ago #22
Fins2MyHeart
Champion
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Sry she looks like this when ready

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7 months ago #23
Joe H
Silver Member
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cool maybe they have had fry but the other fish in the tank just eat them

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7 months ago #24
Fins2MyHeart
Champion
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Ya go to ur LFS and pick out 3 ghost srimp with green little balls under there stomach and one without them then put them in. A 5 gallon with sponge filter l to themselves with Los I live plants


Hey I'm not to young😄 hey it's your opinion

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7 months ago #25
amneris3
Blogs: 1
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There are varied reports on breeding ghost shrimp. Some say they need brackish for the larvae to develop, some say it is possible in fresh.

Either way, the larvae are tiny compared to other types of aquarium shrimp. They need a microscopic food source, fine filtration and lots of cover from predation.

Shrimps mate, instantaneously, then the fertilized eggs are carried underneath the females swimmerets, as shown in the example you posted.

I have had lots of cherry shrimp babies and lots of blue pearl shrimp babies, but have never successfully had ghost shrimp babies.

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7 months ago #26
CaptainNemo
Silver Member
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Hey guys this forum started a year ago you can start a new one if you need some info

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6 months ago #27
Fishfur
Guest

Sorry, accidental double post.

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6 months ago #28
Fishfur
Guest

I can see this is an old thread, but having successfully raised several broods of American Ghost shrimp, sp. palaemonetes, thought I might add my comments.
They don't need brackish water, but they also don't have live babies like cherry shrimp do. They have larvae, just like Amano shrimp, but their larvae don't need salt water at all. If you are not sure of the species of shrimp you have, ask where you got them. There are a few species that get called Ghost shrimp besides the American one. But the American one is totally fresh water, native to southern US waters which is why they're so cheap in the States. We pay a lot more for them up here in Canada.

They are sold as feeders, so they tend to be handled without much care. So it's not terribly unusual to have one die on you. If it happens, it may well not have anything to do with you or how you kept it. They only live about a year, maybe 18 months at most, but if you can raise even a few babies from a few batches of eggs, you can keep a small colony going.

If you want to raise them, best to have a separate tank. Put females with eggs in, take them out after the eggs vanish. Eggs float to the surface and hatch there. Depending on temperature, they will morph into shrimplets about four days later. Helps to have some greenwater or maybe powdered chlorella or spirulina on hand to feed larvae.. you mix the powdered algae with water well, and then feed it like the cultured kind.

Once they do morph, you'll see them, hanging upside down just under the surface. The big black eyes and their bent backs are their most obvious features, the legs and whiskers are near impossible to see without some good magnification.

I kept mine in a 5G, with a slow sponge filter and tons of plants, some wood and rocks and sandy substrate. They aren't fussy about substrate at all. I fed the larvae cultured greenwater, but in a mature tank, they'd probably find enough to eat on their own. I've had them hatch and survive to adulthood in a 29G community tank with a lot of fish in it.. but most of them get eaten if fish are present.

You could keep them without any filter if you wished to.. just make sure the tank is very thickly planted and lighted well enough to keep the plants growing well. Shrimp have an extremely low bioload compared to fish, so this can work well. Sponge filters are a good food source though, either way works. Floating plants are ok but make it hard to see the shrimplets when they appear.

First few days they float, just under the surface, during the day or lighted period. They sink to the bottom when it gets dark, then rise up next day. They can only catch food that comes close enough., so I fed them a few micro worms at this point. Super finely powdered fish food might work too. You'd want a texture like baby powder.

Then they start swimming, and are soon all over the tank and eat what adults eat from then on. I didn't feed them anything for the first week after they started swimming, and most of them survived. They will moult frequently, so you'll see tiny shells floating around, but that's all they are. Leave them in the tank.

I gave them a very few small algae or shrimp pellets after the first week, but they can survive for weeks on the biofilm, provided there is enough of it. Cultured green water seems to assist in growing a lot of biofilm, though I am not sure why. It won't turn tank water green unless you overfeed it. It's only needed for the larvae, or if you unsure there's enough bacteria and such in the water column to feed the larvae. I stopped using it once the shrimplets had morphed.

You'll get the best survival if you take out the females. They will often eat babies, so best to remove them and put them back with the males to become berried again. I had quite a number of them live to adulthood and reproduce in their turn, so it's very possible to raise them, it's just not quite as easy as it is with cherry shrimp.

Ah, one other thing. When the eggs are about ready to be let go, they will have dropped down on the swimmerets. They sort of look like beads on strings. The picture in this thread shows a shrimp that's got quite some time to go before she lets her eggs go.

You might notice eyes in the eggs once they're low down. Once the first eggs get near the bottom of the swimmeret, they are going to fall off at any time and the rest will follow along quickly, so if you are going to put them in a separate tank, do it before the eggs get to the bottom of the swimmerets or you will lose some, or all of them.

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3 months ago #29
Allie
Guest

Thank you Fishfur, that is excellent advice. I hope my babies will survive!

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3 months ago #30
dreamtime
Guest

I have Ghost shrimp in my outdoor pond. It's fresh water and those shrimp have been reproducing in there for years.

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