4 years ago#1
alan
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i need advice fast my fish keep dying my water is fine temp is fine all comunity fish i have a rio 400 i do regular water changes i put salt in my tank for the first time last week at a ratio of 1 tea spoon per gallon to try and solve my problem but it hasnt helpd at all the fish get different symptoms such as sunken bellies white fungus on them and realy poor fin condidtion the swim bladders go some times and they tend to sit on the bottom of the tank i have lost some 20 fish in the past 12 weeks and counting i went to my lfs and they said to me today dont worry its not like you are loosing prize discus but thats not the point my fish are dying and i want to keep them healthy and my tank a pleasure to watch please help !!!!!!

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4 years ago#2
tannerwmcoy
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clean water will help but if the fish have a perisite then there giving it to all the other fish. in my mind it is liek loosing a prized fish. all the fish i have are fish i wanted and i liek them all. clean water should do it. how long has the tank been set up? has it been threw the cycle?

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4 years ago#3
alan
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yes had it about 9 months now had a smaller one before it and decided to step it up fish have been fine up untill the last 12 weeks i am looking at it now and i have a female platty dying sunken belly and iratic swimming and i have a columbian tetra swiming on its side !!!

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4 years ago#4
tannerwmcoy
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that sound salo tliek a parisite. you may have to look it up cuz i do not know what it is called. there are things that will help like meds and so on.

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4 years ago#5
dkpate
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Sounds like parasites to me too. I would go get some anti-parasitic food as well as Melafix and Pimafix just in case. Keep the water super clean.
What are your water readings? (Ammonia, nitrite and nitrate?)

The pet store people just want you to keep coming back and buying fish, so they aren't going to be any help.

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4 years ago#6
southern creature
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Hi there mate and welcome,

You've come to the right site!! A stament like ..."dont worry its not like you are loosing prize discus"... is not acceptable here. I suspect this shop owner is simply looking to get more sales from you!!

Like tanner said all fish are wanted, also tanner is right to point out that clean water conditions will cure "most" disease, or atleast prevent it. A lot of diseases are always present and only affect a fish when its' immunity is low. This is usually due to stress from moving, bad water conditions, sudden temprature changes, etc.
*No matter how hard you try to maintain your water and care for your fish, you can easily introduce a sick fish.

I looked up the Rio 400 and this is a good sized tank (118 gallons) for the fish types that you've mentioned. However I'm wondering just how many and what types of fish you have? It is very important to not over crowd your aquarium. This is for reasons of maintaining water quality and avoiding stress from territorial issues!



Now to the symptoms that your fish are displaying. Again tanner is right to suggest a parasite.
Because the fish are wasting, I'd go so far as to say that it sounds like an internal parasite and this is why a salt treatment won't work. The salt will not get into the "gut" of the fish to treat the problem.
You could 1st try feeding an antiparasitic food like "Jungle Antiparasite Food".
However wasting like this could also be fish tuberculosis, while this is quite rare, it is incurable and if antiparasite treatments don't work (after further research) you may need to consider isolating the fish with hollow bellies. You may also need to consider euthanising these fish!?!?

I'm wondering if the salt treatment cured the fungus, poor fin quality and sitting on the bottom. These are not necesarily related to internal parasites (although parasites will lower the fishs' immunity) and may be their own set of problems.
Perhaps do a 50% water changes and try the salt treatment again.
There are also fungus and fin rot treatments.

BTW what are your water parameters, ammonia, nitrite and nitrate levels? pH and general hardness would be good to know too!


Welcome again, we'll get to the bottom of this

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4 years ago#7
KJP
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I rather think the problem is water - fish appear to have different symptoms and that to me would suggest stress conditions and immune system compromise. Please tell us what are your water parameters like ammonia, nitrite and nitrate and what is your partial water changes schedule. I assume the tank is cycled. I would increase pwc to 25-30% weekly or even twice a week an treat the fish with pimafix/melafix to see if it helps. Your tank may be having so called 'old tank syndrome' where inadequate/not big enough water changes cause the toxins to accumulate and at some point the whole system 'crashes'.

What the guys at your lfs said is awful, as is their attitude! As you said you want to see your fish happy and healthy! And we'll help you and resolve any problems that might be causing your fish to be poorly now.

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4 years ago#8
alan
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hi everyone sorry i havnt been back on to answer any questions had a spot of laptop trouble southern i have got 2x mollies 6x sword tails 6x platties 30 x baby zebra danios 6x neons 2x columbian tetras 3xblackwidow tetra 9x silvertip rasbora 2x white cloud 1x opaline gourami 2x albino corys 3x serpe tetra 3x harlaquins 1x common pleco 1x penguin tetra 5 x assorted shrimp i dont know my water parameters as i usualy take a water sample to my lfs for testing i have took your advice and done a 50% water change today raised my temp to 30 degrese the salt never did much but gave it another go to day so i will have to wait and see if it works

thanks again for everybodys advice it is much appreceated

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4 years ago#9
alan
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p.s i have lost 6 fish since i posted my first comment and that was ment to say 20x zebra danios not 30

once again thanx

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4 years ago#10
tannerwmcoy
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thats alot of fish. must have coast alot to get them all so loosign them is bad. i hop it all starts to get better. mollies are brackish water so salt is some thing that shoudl be added for them. but they can adjust to fresh water.

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4 years ago#11
KJP
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Alan - sorry to hear that you continue to have problems. Remember to dissolve salt completely before adding it to the tank. It is big tank but you need to continue with regular water changes. is the tank cycled? maybe there are not enough beneficial bacteria for the tank size? have you added recently any significant number of fish that might have contributed to sudden increase of bio-load? How are the fish - still having various symptoms? My advice is to invest in test kit - you need ammonia, nitrite and nitrate. I hear Api master kit is one of the best and I am going to buy it for myself Now I use tetra - also good. Lfs sometimes say water is okay but in fact it is not. So you test it yourself you know exactly how is your water - and at least can eliminate one factor or three in fact remember ammonia and nitrite have to be zero!

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4 years ago#12
alan
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yes it is cycled and not had a load of fish go in together how much are the test kits? and tanner it has cost a lot but thats not my concern mate the fishes welfare is are you from uk tanner ?

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4 years ago#13
alan
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how do i post pics on here?

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4 years ago#14
KJP
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Go to reply and then click on attach pictures or go to 'my pages' and upload from there. test kits cost approximately 6-8 quid so you need to spend about 20 pounds to have the three major tests. Api master kit with pH also costs 20 pounds.

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4 years ago#15
southern creature
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I think we have all been agreeing with Kasia and this is a water quality issue.
It is poor water that will lead to disease and this will need to be adressed.

I'm just going over your stock levels and this tank seems very well stocked, perhaps a bit over stocked.
A very rough "rule of thumb" for checking your stock levels is 1" of fish per gallon. You have approx 118 gallons, depending on the size of your fish you may be at or over capacity (and likely where over stocked before the deaths).


Mollies............2 x 2" =4"
Swords.............6 x 2" =12"
Platties...........6 x 2" =12"
Columbian tertras..2 x 2" =4"
Penguin Tetra......1 x 2" =2"

Neons..............6 x 1 1/2" =9"
zebra danios......20 x 1 1/2" =30"
Harlequins.........3 x 1 1/2" =4.5"
White clouds.......2 x 1 1/2" =3"
Serpae tertras.....3 x 1 1/2" =4.5"
Silvertip rasboras.9 x 1/1/2" =13.5


Opaline gouramie...1 x 5" =5"
______
111"

Common pleco.......1 x ? but a big and messy fish.

This is a very rough calculation because I do not know the true sizes of your fish e.g. your opaline may be smaller, molly females are lager than males etc. However if we take the pleco into acount then stock levels go up considerably. Plecos are very messy fish and big producers of watse, they will add to your bio-load at a rate higher than most fish their size.


Too many fish will place too high a demand on your bio-load, that is your filters capacity to break down ammonia/fish watse.

The best way for now to deal with your situation would be to keep up regular water changes 30-50% a day, or every other day. This will keep your ammonia levels in check until things get back on track...as your tank gets its cycle/bio-load back in check.
Also have your water tested (if you can buy your own test kits all the better) and please let us know your ammonia, nitrite and nitrate levels.

While water quality is going to be the key. You will also need to treat any existing disease, "ich rid" is a harsh treatment and will depleat your bacteria levels and reduce your filters capacity to handle your bio-load. Melafix/pimafix are much better (natural) treatments. I still think that the hollow fish have a parasite and recommend an antiparasitic food.

Also what filter do you have? This will be playing a key role in all this too.

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4 years ago#16
KJP
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Maybe one of your fish died and you only noticed after some time, or a snail died or plants were rotting at some point, or you used before a medicine that killed tank's friendly bacteria as Southern Creature pointed out. Any of those would have contributed to ammonia and nitrite spikes and affected your fish. Not knowing your parameters and possibly inadequate pwc resulted in fish being exposed to those dangerous toxins. Now for those that survived in order to recover clean water is paramount! You may also think of getting yourself ammonia alert by seachem, but remember it is NOT a substitute for liquid tests. Alerts are okay when all is fine and they are just ' peace of mind' but problematic tank would require regular proper water testing. In fact you may have low ammonia but spike of nitrite that is almost as toxic as ammonia. To properly cycle tank requires two bacteria species and insufficient number of any of them results in cycle problems.

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4 years ago#17
alan
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i did have a fish that died and was stuck in my gravel i didnt notice i but when i did it was rotting i didnt think that would effect things tho

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4 years ago#18
alan
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just tested my water with api 5 in 1 test kit readings are gh= 3.4 ppm (mg/l)
kh= 2.2 ppm (mg/l)
ph= 6.0
no2= 0
no3= 0
i hope i have read the test right i think i have

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4 years ago#19
ChaosReborn
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Wow you don't know what I'd give to have those paramaters testing from my tap water. I literally have to drive across town and pay for RO DI water, lol

Any ammonia?

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4 years ago#20
alan
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my kit does not test for it i cant coplain tho as the kits retail for about 15 uk pounds for a box of 25 test strips and i got 4 boxes given to me today for nothing

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4 years ago#21
ChaosReborn
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True, thats a good deal but try and get an ammonia test kit if you can, preferably the liquid test kit. Its much more accurate and lasts longer.

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4 years ago#22
dkpate
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In the long run the liqiud kits are cheaper too.

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3 years ago#23
email me.
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you can email me at <email> . tell me everything you tried what food you were feeding them what fish were in the aquarium and anything else that might have somthing to do with it.

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2 years ago#24
Jason nc
Guest

Please help me my fish are dying there all 2 years old I've never even had an original fish die in my tank

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2 years ago#25
johnarthur
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Have you tested for toxic nitrogen compounds? Sometimes, established aquariums get old tank syndrome. This happens when toxic nitrogen compounds build to a level which can't be handled by the nitrogen cycle. The result is a sudden increase in ammonia followed by a fish die off. If you're not familiar with the nitrogen cycle, please click this link:
http://www.myaquariumclub.com/the-nitrogen-cycle-for- beginners-358.html

To fix the problem, start changing about 25 percent of the water every few days, and feed no more than the fish eat in a couple of minutes. After ammonia and nitrite stay at zero and nitrate is below 40 ppm, weekly partial water changes are enough. Be sure to use a tap water conditioner that also neutralises toxic nitrogen compounds. Stress Coat is a good choice.

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2 years ago#26
mimireco
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Hi there, I don't know if this will help, but I had fish die two in one day when I had another tank some time ago. I was using tap water with conditioner etc. The balance seemd much harder to maintain. Since I now use only bottled spring water with conditioner my fish are health and happy. I test the water every 2 or three days. If I see the bad levels up I immediately do a partial water change and suck out what poop I can. Then I test after waiting a few hours and my tests are good. But I don't really have much problems right now. Personally I would not use anything but bottled spring water. It's worth the price of $1 a gallon and carrying all the gallons home. I don't trust tap water. There's no telling what the government puts in our water. LOL Anyway, I'm not a fish pro, but I can tell you what works for me. I have celestials and I love there cute faces and big eyes. If one would die I'd be heart broken. If you can't get the liquid tests at least do the strip test as it is easy to do often. You can test everyday in a matter of minutes and it is super easy.

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2 years ago#27
fishgirl
Guest

Me too all my fish are dying ive lost 10 in about 2 months. HELPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPP!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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2 years ago#28
stephanie
Guest

yes i have a 20 gallon to but before i add fish i have everything running for 4days before i put some fishs they all small about 7 my temprature read 78-80 i have a heater to but i afraid to turn it on my aparment really don,t stay cold n the front room i dont now if the water get to hot or is the water to cold but i look it up they said most fish like 77-80 so i woke up this norning found one of my fish dead

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2 years ago#29
stephanie
Guest

yes i have a 20 gallon to but before i add fish i have everything running for 4days before i put some fishs they all small about 7 my temprature read 78-80 i have a heater to but i afraid to turn it on my aparment really don,t stay cold n the front room i dont now if the water get to hot or is the water to cold but i look it up they said most fish like 77-80 so i woke up this norning found one of my f ish dead

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2 years ago#30
johnarthur
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Stephanie: You were responding to an older series of postings but dealing with a fairly common problem. If you add fish before the aquarium has a working nitrogen cycle, they are likely to be affected by ammonia poisoning.

In a well balanced aquarium, the nitrogen cycle processes the toxic ammonia naturally produced by fish and any decaying organic matter. Ammonia will make the fish vulnerable to diseases and parasites. Here is how to fix the problem:
http://www.myaquariumclub.com/solving-water-quality- issues-1924.html

For some details about the nitrogen cycle and other aquarium basics, please click the Top Blogs list at the upper left of the page. The blogs are brief and non technical.

Good luck, and please keep us posted.

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