2 years ago#1
Thomasthecat21
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If you keep an angelfish and 2-3 ghost shrimp in a 20 gallon tank, would the ghost shrimp be eaten by the angelfish? Thanks

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2 years ago#2
CollegeFish
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I think once the angelfish reached full maturity it probably would eat the ghost shrimp unless they were able to hide very well... I was warned against keeping small fish such as neon tetras with an angel for that very reason. Like other large fish, they will eat what will fit in their mouth.

Plus, I was keeping two ghost shrimp with very small fish that I didn't think could hurt them... 3 tetras, 3 mollies, and a small bristlenose pleco. Even with those fish, the ghost shrimp somehow dissapeared (were eaten). Although mysteriously enough, they didn't go missing until I added the pleco :\

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2 years ago#3
Thomasthecat21
Guest

Actually, I had a friend that had a tank with different kinds of fish as well as a Pleco. The fish disappeared one by one and the only fish left was the Pleco. Maybe plecos eat fish as well as algae..

Well, are there any freshwater shrimp that can be kept with angelfish?

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2 years ago#4
CollegeFish
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Oh my My boyfriend told me he had one once that attacked his glofish, but I didn't believe him XD

I dunno if there are any :\ I don't know how big most varieties get... I know there are many, and they can be very pretty and interesting to watch, but some of them cost significanly more than ghost shrimp and it would be a shame to have them gobbled up. Maybe you could research how large different varieties grow? I think I noted from an earlier forum post of yours you were looking for what would help clean your tank best and could be kept with an angel? (or maybe I have you confused with someone else XD) I didn't want to say anything because I'm no expert and I'm not entirely sure how much you can keep in a 20 gallon... but my angelfish (so far) has not even spared a glance for my bristlenose pleco. The bristlenose has a couple of places to hide, and comes out and does his thing in the evenings and at night. All research I've done tells me that the bristlenose variety should get to be 4 to 5 inches fully grown, and the angel never seems to notice him. He does produce a lot of poo though, so I'm not sure how well he and an angel together would suit a 20 gallon :\

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2 years ago#5
Goldibug
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A great site to check out for stocking is http://www.aqadvisor.com The angelfish will most likely eat any shrimp. They don't always eat them whole but pick at the shrimp limb by limb. Bristlenose plecos are great and only eat algae not other fish like the common pleco. They due produce a ton of waste though. Have you looked into otocolus? They are great algae eaters as well but do best in schools. I can't remember their adult size but I know they don't get huge.

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2 years ago#6
johnarthur
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The common pleco and the so called Chinese algae eater are nocturnal animals. Often, they miss food when the other fish are fed. If you feed them sinking pellets well after lights out, the nocturnal fish may leave tankmates alone.

However, when they get really hungry the pleco and the algae eater will suck the protective slime coat off sleeping tankmates. More than a few aquarists have reported losing all the fish except for the predatory nocturnal monsters.

If that's not enough reason to avoid the common pleco and Chinese algae eater that, by the way, does not eat algae, here are a couple more considerations. Plecos are messy and can grow to over a foot long. In addition, any fish adds to the biological load on the aquarium, and most are not effective as cleanup crew members.

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2 years ago#7
Thomasthecat21
Guest

Yep, I hate plecos and Chinese algae eaters that I'm sort of afraid to look at them. That's why I wanted to get ghost shrimp, because they are good cleaners and don't look as bad when they are dead (I know, cruel of me, but when fish die and I have a hard time removing them when they are at the bottom, and it's worse when they look like a mess of guts and scales)

Are there any other algae eaters that aren't any type of Pleco?

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2 years ago#8
Thomasthecat21
Guest

Thank you for the advice so far.

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2 years ago#9
Thomasthecat21
Guest

I think I did ask what type of algae eaters can be kept with angelfish in a 20 gallon tank.

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2 years ago#10
Thomasthecat21
Guest

I used the aqua adviser before and it said that I could keep 1 angelfish, 6 glofish, 4 corydoras in a 20 gallon tank and that it would not be fully stocked. It is a really cool stock adviser, so I'll use it to see about the ghost shrimp.

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2 years ago#11
Goldibug
Master
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I love that stocking calculator as well As I mentioned before the bristlenose pleco is a fantastic pleco. They get 4" max and eat only algae their whole life. Mine is also amazingly lazy and just hangs on the driftwood all day. I'm sure he does more at night because my tank is staying pretty clean algae wise. I've heard the zebra snail is also great and doesn't reproduce insanely fast like other snails do. The mystery snail would also work just make sure to remove their eggs with a razor blade to control population. Their eggs are easy to find because they are solid colored, in clusters and always above the water line. Since ghost shrimp are so inexpensive they will work as long as you're not worried about them possibly getting eaten. Also make sure you don't use anything containing copper in the tank if you use snails/shrimp as copper will kill them.

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2 years ago#12
Thomasthecat21
Guest

Ok. Thank you for the advice!

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2 years ago#13
fishlover32
Fresh Member
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no they won't

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2 years ago#14
johnarthur
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I think the angelfish will really appreciate all those tankmates. In fact when the angelfish grows a bit more, he will likely have most of them over for lunch.

The load calculators are somewhat handy, but they may encourage people to put a maximum biological load on an aquarium. This leaves no room for error and makes it difficult to keep the aquarium healthy.

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