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2 years ago #1
SarahNB
Guest

In a 10 gallon tank, how many goldfish would fit and be comfortable? I was told that a single goldfish requires 1 gallon? Is that true? If so what is a good combo of different kinds of gold fish for my tank? Any info is greatly appreciated, thanks yall

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2 years ago #2
CollegeFish
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What you were told, that a single goldfish requires 1 gallon, is absolutely not true. I would love to tell you that you could have at least 1 goldfish comfortably in 10 gallons... but that isn't true either. I had one in 10 gallons because I didn't do my research and I'm fairly sure that had a hand in his death Fancy goldfish actually need at least 20 gallons for only one of them because they grow fairly large and produce a lot of waste and ammonia.

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2 years ago #3
SarahNB
Guest

I've had 2 common goldfish in my tank since February and they look happy to me. What kind of fish is better for a 10 gallon tank? But I don't want to get rid of my fish, but if they start getting too big what should I do?

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2 years ago #4
CollegeFish
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Well, common goldfish can grow to be at least 12 inches long, so they really aren't ideal tank fish... but they do make lovely pond fish The thing about goldfish is that they actually do not "grow to the size of the tank" as a lot of people say... it actually stunts their growth, and while their body stops growing, their internal organs and such keep growing, which eventually kills them. So I would say that finding a large goldfish pond to re-home them in would be the best habitat for the fish.

There are many smaller tropical species that you could home in a 10 gallon tank with the addition of a heater. Try taking a look www.aqadvisor.com. It has tons of fish species listed and will give you an estimate of fish for your tank size. Plus it's really fun to play around with

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2 years ago #5
SarahNB
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Thanks for the info, and the website you gave me, I looked at it I don't understand it at all.

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2 years ago #6
CollegeFish
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Oh lol I'm sorry XD It's like a calculator website... at the top couple of slots you select what size tank and filter you have. Once you enter that, you can chose for it to show species that fit your tank and it will give you a list of many kinds of fish that would be suitable to a 10 gallon.

Personally, I've kept mollies, bettas, and tetras in 10 gallons, but there are other choices. I personally enjoy mollies because of their lively behavior, but you can't keep too many in a 10 gallon because as far as I understand they are also fairly large waste producers. They're fun fish to watch though in my opinion

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2 years ago #7
tmjohnson
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@COLLEGEFISH You are so right! I bought my fantail goldfish, Mo, in August, and I had him in a 10 gallon tank. After reading MAC postings, I realized the errors of my ways. I bought a 40 gallon aquarium, cycled it for 5 weeks and added live plants and an air bubbler.

While waiting for the new tank to cycle, I was a partial water changing fiend with the 10 gallon tank.

After the nitrogen cycle was going I moved Mo to the new tank using the drip method. In just 2 weeks in the new, big tank Mo has seemed to grow and blossom.

I bought one additional fantail goldfish -- Goldi-Lu-- and quaranteened her for about 10 days in the small tank.

Mo and Goldi-Lu now appear to be loving life in their bigger home. I now have a master API water testing kit so I can more accurately test the water. I really appreciate allI have learned from the contributors at MAC!

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2 years ago #8
Luvn Bubbles
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No goldfish can be happy with a 10 gallon. They need at least 50, no matter what!

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2 years ago #9
tmjohnson
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I agree with the 10 gallon not being enough for one goldfish let alone two! That is why I now have a Aqueon 40 gallon breeder tank. According to Aqadvisor -- which seems to be a very respected site by the MAC members -- my aquarium stocking level is at 61% and my water filtration capacity is 124% due to using a Aqueon Quietflow 55. I'm already doing partial water changes at the 21% level that Aqadvisor recommends so I think my fish should be enjoying their new tank quite well.

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2 years ago #10
thea
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to the original poster,
If you are interested in the needs of goldfish a good article is :
http://www.myaquariumclub.com/goldfish-101- 11174823.html

The most important points are:
You need 20 gallons for your first goldfish and 10 more for each additional if not full grown. When full grown they really belong in ponds as commons can grow to 18" long and fancies to 12" long!!

Goldfish are really prolific ammonia and waste producers, this is why, even when tiny, they need a lot of water.

Unlike other freshwater fish (where recommended water changes are about 25% for non-overcrowded tank) goldfish benefit from large water changes. 50% per week is a recommended minimum, more the better.

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2 years ago #11
CollegeFish
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@tmjohnson

That's great Sadly, I was one of many people told that Goldfish do well in bowls... that was before I joined My Aquarium Club. When I joined, the best I could do was a 10. But sadly his time in the bowl had pretty much destroyed him before I could obtain anything larger.

Now we have a 55 gal. that we got used at a pet shop, and I think that my mother and I have decided if something ever happens to the mollies and bristlenose plec we have in it that we want to start again with goldfish lol I find them to be very beautiful and entertaining despite their high demand for space

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2 years ago #12
SarahNB
Guest

Thanks for all the info y'all, but at this time I don't have the funds to buy anything bigger than what I have soon I shall be looking for a suitable new home for my cow pattie and tortilla (my goldfish)

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2 years ago #13
CollegeFish
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That is completely understandable. I feel like goldfish are a type of fish that a lot of pet shops commonly give misinformation about simply because most people have seen them in bowls, etc. And at the time my goldfish was getting sick we really didn't have a way to buy any new tank bigger than a 10. I do hope that you've found some info on other fish you would like to keep though There really are some great little fish out there I think you would enjoy.

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2 years ago #14
SarahNB
Guest

I did look at mollies, are they related to bettas? I really liked the pictures of the Dalmatian looking mollies I want colorful and unique looking fish

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2 years ago #15
CollegeFish
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No, they aren't related to bettas. They do come in a variety of colors though. Even bright yellow... I believe they're called cremesicle mollies. And if you like really bright fish, platies can be very bright oranges and yellows and reds. Fancy guppies can also be very bright beautiful fish.

I believe that dwarf gouramis are related to bettas. In fact, I'm not sure how true it is but I have been told that you can keep dwarf gouramis in a 10 gallon... you'd have to look into it, I've never kept any. But they are absolutely gorgeous fish I think, although they are more sensitive and delicate than mollies and platies.

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2 years ago #16
SarahNB
Guest

I want fish that don't cost a lot, but are full of spunk and pretty colored

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2 years ago #17
CollegeFish
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Well I love mollies because of their "spunk" lol, I like their activity level in the tank. I've never kept platies, but I feel like they might be somewhat similar in their behavior, the petshop I get most of my fish at keeps them in the same sale tank. And both are pretty common fish so they're not expensive at all in my opinion. They might cost a little more than your common goldfish, but less than a fan-tail/fancy goldfish.

I think some people would debate this, but I think you would be fine with 3 mollies or 3 platies in your 10 gallon with a heater. That's what I've kept at least, and that's what the AqAdvisor website I sent you the link to recommends. (A heater is very important as they are tropical fish and won't be able to survive at the same temperature level as your goldfish can.) And if you don't want babies... I would suggest a group of 3 females, because they are live-bearers and you will end up with babies at some point or other if you have a male lol

One more thing... sorry this is so long XD... Mollies are ideally brackish water fish, but can survive in fresh water also. All of mine were bred in fresh water, so that is all they have ever lived in; so make sure if you do get mollies that they are in fresh water. I've never actually seen a petshop market mollies as a brackish water fish, but since your tank is fresh water you just need to make sure, because if you take them from a shop that kept them in brackish water straight to freshwater, it will most likely kill them.

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2 years ago #18
CollegeFish
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Oh, I meant 4 mollies or platies, not 3 XP That's what the AqAdvisor says. I've only ever kept 3 together, with a few other small fish.

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2 years ago #19
SarahNB
Guest

What's the max number and multi breeds that do good together?

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2 years ago #20
CollegeFish
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It honestly depends on what size tank you have, as well as what kind of fish they are. Mollies aren't typically aggressive except for the males among each other when there aren't enough females.

In my 10 gallon at school I have divided a little less than a 3rd of the tank off and I'm keeping a betta fish in it. And actually, a betta can be kept in a community tank with non-aggressive fish. I just have a divider up for mine because one of his fins was damaged and doesn't work properly anymore. My mom's betta is in a community tank. I've never personally kept a betta with mollies, but I have seen photos on this forum of a betta with mollies. However, that also depends on the personal temperament of the fish themselves.

I've also been raising some kuhli loaches in my 10 with my mollies at school to put in my 55. I haven't studied much about keeping them in the 10 because I plan to transfer them once they're bigger, but according to AqAdvisor a tank with 3 mollies and 4 kuhli loaches would be right at 100 percent stocked. Kuhli loaches tend to hide a lot, but they are very interesting looking fish.

Or you could even put some shrimp in your tank if you get mollies. Ghost shrimp are VERY cheap... like 36 cents or so depending on where you get them, because a lot of fish eat them, but I've never had an issue with my mollies bothering them so far. And they're not colorful... the ghost/glass shrimp variety isn't at least... but they're fun to watch in my opinion

Whatever you decided on, remember to take a look at the nitrogen cycle, you can find information about it with a quick search in the advance search bar here And don't stock your tank at 100% right away, you can add fish slowly a few at a time.

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2 years ago #21
SarahNB
Guest

You can put bettas with other fish? I currently have a beta in a 2 1/2 gallon tank in the livingroom, but I always thought that they had to be by themselves

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2 years ago #22
SarahNB
Guest

What is a nitrogen cycle?

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2 years ago #23
CollegeFish
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Yes, depending on the temperament of your betta fish, it is entirely possible to put them in a community tank as long as there aren't any aggressive fish that are going to provoke it. That's another thing that some people debate about... I have heard that they're best by themselves because they're easy to over feed, but we've never had a problem with mom's betta in the community tank and he gets along fine with the other fish. We're planning on putting some cories cats in our two 10 gallons that only have a single betta in each at the moment.

I would say, since you already have the 2.5 set up and running for him, once you put a few fish in the 10 you could try introducing him into the community tank and see how he does. Because since you have the 2.5, you can always separate him again if it doesn't work

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2 years ago #24
CollegeFish
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I can't explain it very well myself, I got all my info from other more experienced members on this site lol But a nitrogen cycle is essentially what builds up the beneficial bacteria in your tank so that your ammonia levels don't rise as quickly. It's better for your fish to cycle the tank before you introduce them to the tank if you can

However, since you've had your goldfish for a while now, your tank may already be cycled. You can get a test kit to check the ammonia, nitrate, and nitrite levels. But I would say, when you take your goldfish out to re-home them, do a partial water change, but leave the tank running. Don't change the filter cartridge or empty all the water from the tank. Just leave it running as it is with a partial water change and add your heater. That way, the beneficial bacteria that is already there won't be removed.

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2 years ago #25
SarahNB
Guest

My jet lee, has spunk if your face is close by the glass where the light is hitting you, he swims up to the glass and puffs out his gill looking things he is soo cute.

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2 years ago #26
CollegeFish
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lol that is cute. My mother's betta is very laid back... I rarely ever see him flare except on occasion when one of the other fish is annoying him, then he puts it in its place. He is most definitely the most dominant fish in the tank, but he generally leaves the other fish alone.

So like I said, your betta may or may not take well to living with other fish... but since you have a separate tank for him, it couldn't hurt to try. You can always separate them again if he is very aggressive toward the other fish.

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2 years ago #27
SarahNB
Guest

I just recently did a complete cleaning on my big tank, so I emptied all the water out of it, is that bad to do? I do change out some of the water every two weeks or so and I change out the filters every month or a little sooner depending on how dirty it is, but I've never had problems when I completely change the water, and i always add start zyme and a water conditioner with the stuff to help the fish, and I don't have a heater in it, should I get one?

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2 years ago #28
SarahNB
Guest

Are mollies good with bettas?

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2 years ago #29
CollegeFish
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You should never change 100% of your water at once, it kills off the good bacteria and starts your nitrogen cycle over. It's mainly just stressful on your fish, and could kill more delicate species. 25% is generally good to change at one time, or while you still have your two goldfish in it, 50% at a time might be good, or do 25% changes more frequently.

With your filter, you actually don't have to change them every month, which will save you money lol When your filter looks dirty, and you do a water change, use some of the old water from the tank to rinse the filter in before you dump the water out, then put the filter back in. The filter also holds a lot of your beneficial bacteria, so you don't need to replace it until its about to fall apart basically.

You won't need a heater with your goldfish, they are cold water fish and if the water gets too warm it can actually harm them. But any tropical fish you get will require a heater to survive. After you re-home your goldfish, you can purchase a heater then for the tank and let it warm up before you buy your new fish. You can also get small thermometers that stick to the side of your tank for a little over a dollar that will tell you what the temperature in your tank is.

And mollies with a betta... as I said I personally have never tried it but I've seen people who have. I think there is a photo in this month's "Picture of The Month" contest from a user who has a lovely betta in with some mollies. Some bettas take well to living with other fish, and some don't.

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2 years ago #30
CollegeFish
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Oh, and in a 10 gallon, it would probably be better to change the water once a week rather than once a month. Especially right now with your goldfish... they produce a lot more ammonia and waste than most fish do, so if you're only changing the water once a month, even if it doesn't appear to be dirty, the ammonia levels are probably very high.

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