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3 years ago #1
mr.dovii
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so my question is . is it safe to use distilled water in fish tanks. the reason why i ask is because my ph level and alkinity is 8.3 im trying to get it to 7.5 i figure since distilled water has many thing taking out of it would be ok to use to help lower the ph and alkinity or maybe im wrong. i know people say to change the water but everytime i change the water the ph and alkinity only rise even higher. like for instance in my 29 gallon fish tank could i syphon out 10 gallons and refill the tank with 10 gallons of distilled water and wouldnt that help lower the ph and alkinity or would it nt. please im needing some advice.

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3 years ago #2
Faryaz
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Bt ders no mineral or anything which are essential for the bacterial growth and fish 2...

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3 years ago #3
jlk
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Have you tested your tap waters ph after it has gassed out? Put some of your tap water in a bucket with an airstone or bubble wand & leave it for 24hrs then check the ph. AFter you do this, let us know what your ph is. Adding distilled water is going to create a mess with your tanks. You would need additional tests & you would have to add RO minerals to establish buffers. The ph swing would probably sicken or kill your fish as well. Are your tanks cycled? If not, then your ph is rising because of they are cycling & ammonia is high. If you want to lower your ph, use driftwood or peat moss but almost all fish will adapt to ph as long as its stable.

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3 years ago #4
mr.dovii
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All my my tanks have this problem. My 90 gallon tank has been up for almotba year. Ever since i got the 90 gallon i had ph and alkinity. Problems i thought mayb it was the gravel. And i took 12 gallons out of my 90 gallonand put it n my 29 gallon so i wouldnt have to cycle it. But i take water sample n to my lfs n they say its fine.But my ph n alkinity is really high but u take 25 % water change about onnce every week i dig the syphon. Hose deep n collect the waste. My nitrates ans nitrites. R always. The fish have a black tint lineing on the edge of there tail and fins. Idk whts wrong but i just want happy healthy fish

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3 years ago #5
jlk
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Please invest in an API master fw test kit! You need to be able to accurately test your water for amm/nitrites/nitrates/ph if you want healthy tanks. Moving water from one tank to a new tank will not cycle it because your bb (benefical bacteria) live on your substrate & in your filter. The black showing up on your fishes fins is most likely caused by ammonia burns-high amm levels destroy the delicate fin tissue & it turns black. Healthy water with no amm/nitrites & few nitrates will heal this over time.

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3 years ago #6
johnarthur
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Since most aquarium fish are fairly well adapted to typical aquarium conditions, it's not too important to get all of the water parameters just right. In fact, trying too hard can produce sudden changes in water parameters and thus make the fish sick. An exception is ammonia and nitrite should always be zero.

Distilled and reverse osmosis water do not have the minerals necessary to buffer pH; used exclusively they will send the pH out of control (very bad). You can buy pH buffers, but it's much easier if you use RO or distilled water for every other partial water change. It may be necessary to adjust water types based on pH readings.

Usually, pH decreases slowly as an aquarium matures. The soft, neutral pH water in the Amazon basin where many aquarium fish originate is the result of tannins produced by leaf litter and fallen trees.

In an aquarium, the safe, gradual ways to reduce pH and soften the water are adding driftwood, catappa leaf (Indian almond leaf) peat or a black water extract. Leaves collected near agricultural of industrial areas are likely polluted and thus unsafe. Tannins will stain the water a light amber, but the stain goes away with a few partial water changes.

Driftwood and catappa leaf are available through aquabid.com and eBay.

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3 years ago #7
mr.dovii
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hey is there a product i could at like petsmart to lower the ammonia level like ammo lock or is there any other product to drop the ammonia level please ne body

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3 years ago #8
jlk
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Lots of pwcs with a good water conditioner such as Prime or Amquel Plus (both detox amm/nitrite/nitrates) is the best way to reduce ammonia levels. None of the amm-lock type of products or water conditioners remove ammonia-they only temporarily convert it to less toxic ammonium (which is still unhealthy for fish) for a period of @24hrs. Water changes are the only way to remove ammonia!

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3 years ago #9
johnarthur
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Thanks for the clarification. I have suspected that Stress Coat Plus neutralizes ammonia by adding a hydrogen ion and thus changing it to ammonium. Although it's not the most potent water conditioner on the market, Stress Coat seems to work well and be very forgiving of inaccurate dosing. For an aquarium with serious water quality issues, the more potent conditioners may more effective.

Again, thanks for the clarification.

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3 years ago #10
jlk
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I was never able to find out the exact chemistry behind how prime or amquel plus work! Both companies claim it to be a 'closely guarded patented secret'...but they were able to tell me just the basics- ammonia is chemically converted to ammonium up to levels of 2ppm. Perhaps in 7 years when the patents expire, we will be able to get more sufficient explanations!

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3 years ago #11
mr.dovii
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I have been using stress coat + didnt somebody say tht redue ammonia and metals

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3 years ago #12
mr.dovii
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Ok so today. I tested my water everything was in safe zone except my nitrites we're 20 n the lady at the store said it was a bit high but in normal zone.Whats really weird is my ammonia level was also safe.So i dnt get y the fish have tht black lining on there fins and tail. Supposible ammonia burns.The lady said it could b not enough oxygen in the water but i have 2 big. Canister. Filters. And a emporor 400 filter im about. Ready to give. Up ne helpful idea's

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3 years ago #13
nexuslite
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If nitrites were 20 ppm that is very bad. If however you meant nitrates then that is a good level for them.

If your filter outlets aren't above the water then they don't add oxygen they just move water around. More light and lower temperature will also increase oxygen in the water.

Give the black edges some time to heal. It could take up to as long as they have had the black edges or longer to heal once you have figured out the problem.

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3 years ago #14
mr.dovii
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My thing is i just dont get it. Go check my video's twll me if u see anything wrong. Jackson jones402 thts on youtube but idk the fish i do have ive only had them for a couple weeks i got them from another guy. I have 4 black convict cichlids 4 white convicts cichlids 2 flowerhorns and 2 dovii cichlids with fry. So idk wht else to do
And in my 30 gallon i have 2 marineland 350 biowheel filters and a oxugen bubble wand

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3 years ago #15
nexuslite
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I don't see anything wrong but then again I don't know what cichlids are suppose to look like, and the lighting is a little low.

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3 years ago #16
mr.dovii
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Wht kind of lights are good i have a aqua glo and a 10'000 k light idk wht lights cichlids are suppose to have but a lot of cichlids need. Low lighting

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3 years ago #17
nexuslite
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Yeah I just mentioned the light thing as an option. Again I don't know much about cichlids.

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3 years ago #18
Okstout4
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I personally use drinking water in my tank as we have well water and I dont want to deal w/what could be in that water.

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3 years ago #19
amol kumar
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biggest problem with distilled water is that it does not contains much oxygen and minerals required for fishes to live.instead you can use pond water or other suitable type of water.

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3 years ago #20
johnarthur
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Distilled and reverse osmosis water have no pH buffering minerals. Using either exclusively will result in pH fluctuations which are harmful to the fish. You can add buffering minerals or use conditioned tap water for every other partial water change.

I'm not sure about using pond water unless it's boiled. Almost any outdoor water source may contain microorganisms that are harmful to aquarium fish.

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3 years ago #21
Jackturtles1A
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if you are going to use distilled water still use water conditioner/neutralizer with it because it can still contain chemicals.

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2 years ago #22
mimireco
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I do know distilled water is made from pure steam. Is that what makes the difference from spring water I use?
I use something the guy at petsmart recommended to balance the PH. It really worked great. It is sort of a new product by Tetra called Correct PH 7.0. It suppose to make the PH just right and it did in my tank.

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2 years ago #23
jlk
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mimireco wrote:
I do know distilled water is made from pure steam. Is that what makes the difference from spring water I use?
I use something the guy at petsmart recommended to balance the PH. It really worked great. It is sort of a new product by Tetra called Correct PH 7.0. It suppose to make the PH just right and it did in my tank.


Distilled water contains zero minerals, electrolytes, buffers etc that are absoltuely necessary to keep fish healthy and a tank stable. It should NOT be used in a fw tank unless these are added back with a product such as Seachems Replenish or Kents RO Right in addition to a water conditioner.

PLEASE STOP listening to the people at petsmart!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Your going to kill your fish!!! You should NEVER tamper with ph unless you have a complete understanding of water chemistry and know exactly what you are doing. Most fish will adjust to any ph as long as its not extreme (below 6 or above 8.6) when they are properly acclimated. Changing the ph by as little as .1 can not only sicken & stress fish but in fact, kill them. Adding ph products will result in drastic ph swings & only work temporarily resulting in even more drastic ph swings. A STABLE ph is the important thing to in having healthy fish.
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2 years ago #24
mimireco
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From what I was told and what it says is that the product just makes the PH what it is supposed to be, whatever that means. My fish are all healthy and happy. One month they are still swimming happily. I did one water change. I never add the entire fizz pill, only a portion if PH is a little off after waiting 24 hours after water change. With that it is just right. so what should I do?

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2 years ago #25
thea
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NO...

No Distilled water in tank. Fish need the minerals and buffers in regular water -- distilled water has nothing but H20.

No. DO not add any chemicals to raise or lower your Ph. Like you have been told, most fish will adapt to whatever Ph your water has (within reason of course).

Slightly higher than ideal or slightly lower than ideal Ph WILL NOT SICKEN your fish. Making it go up and down with chemicals WILL.

These chemicals will only TEMPORARILY lower or raise your PH and then the Ph will go back to whatever your tank is naturally. BAD THING for your fish.

Aquarium grade drifwood or Indian almond leaves can be used if you HAVE to lower your Ph, they do it naturally and slowly and will not hurt your fish.

Shells or coral will raise PH slowly.

But truth be told there is really no reason to do.

More pressing in nature if you want to mess with your tank is the fact that it seems you are saying you have only done one water change this month.

Is this true? If so definitely need to do more -- both to mitigate rise in toxic compounds like ammonia and nitrites and to refresh the water of its buffers and minerals.

If I have misunderstood then forgive me.

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2 years ago #26
jlk
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+1
Thea pointed out a glaring issue here. One water change in month, especially with 4 goldfish in a 10g tank, is NOT acceptable. I am going to post the goldfish info & care link AGAIN for you- please, please read it so you can learn how to properly take care of your fish so they can live a long, happy life. No more ph chemicals.
http://www.myaquariumclub.com/goldfish-101- 11174823.html

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2 years ago #27
mimireco
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I do water change every two weeks for my fish.

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2 years ago #28
thea
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Still not enough. Goldfish are VERY messy creatures and create LOTS of waste. Many who own goldfish do upto 50% water changes several TIMES a week.

Do yourself a favour and READ the article that JLK posted. It will give you the tools you need to keep your goldfish safe and happy lives (goldfish, if kept well can live VERY long lives) and give yourself a pain and anxiety free time as a fishy parent.

The regular rule for other fish is 20-30% water changed EVERY week. This is for under or normally stocked tanks.

Goldfish need much more water changes. The minimum should be 50% per week (broken down to 25% twice a week)
More is even better. for goldfish you CAN change upto 75% of the water EVERY WEEK>

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2 years ago #29
mimireco
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I just bought a 30 gallon tank. I think it is good for now. Should they gorw larger I will go bigger on the tank. The tank is more long than high, which I like for now. My fish are not that big. Thanks for info.

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2 years ago #30
KJP
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Assuming the smaller tank you had before was not cycled you will need now to cycle the 30g tank - so please do frequent water changes of about 30% every 2nd day, or 20% daily. This would depend on your readings of ammonia and nitrite. Do you have test kits to check this? Pet shops can test water as well, but then ask them to give you real numbers not only 'okay' as an answer. Better still if you could monitor it at home, liquid tests are regarded as more reliable.

That was a really great decision to get your fish a bigger tank!

Once the tank is fully cycled, you will need to do about 30% water changes weekly. Let us know how your fish are doing in their new home.

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