3 years ago#1
tropical_tiffini
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So I don't need any more baby fish floating around, but I was thinking how cool it would look to see my two adult molly's fry. I have a female dalmatian molly and a male creamcicle lyretail molly. I'm not trying to breed them, and I don't really want to but I know they do "The Sex Dance" all the time, but she never seems pregnant and she's only had 1 batch of babies in the 4 months I've had her.

My question is: can different types of mollies breed with each other and create different patterns on their fry? I'm just wondering. I'm sure I'll be finding out soon enough, if the mating is successful (and there's not really a reason it shouldn't be) even though I'm not trying. But does anyone know? I think it'd be fascinating to see a light orange lyretail molly with dalmatian spots all over.

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3 years ago#2
nexuslite
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Unless the male has an extended gonopodium there is no reason why they shouldn't be able to mate. There has been successful guppy/molly crosses. However, the crosses can't be bread because of the extended gonopodium issue. Other causes of this issue are ribbon fins. Which are much longer fins on the bottom of the fish.

The lyretail most likely is a recessive trait and will be dominated by the dalmatian molly tail unless that is lyretail also. The first generation will most likely be yellow spotted unless something else is recessive or dominant that causes them not to be. The second generation is where it gets really fun though. Everything gets scrambled and you should see fish with different traits from each parent and you may even get your yellow spotted lyretail if it doesn't happen in the first generation.

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3 years ago#3
tropical_tiffini
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These are the best pics I have of him. Does he have an extended gonopodium? I did a quick Google search, but I can't really tell if its just that it hangs more than its tucked onto the body or what.

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3 years ago#4
nexuslite
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That, I couldn't tell you. I don't have enough experience with fish that can't mate to tell the difference. However, that is the only thing I have run across that would prevent a fish from being able to mate.

It most likely is a case that the female is rejecting the male. If she has given birth before she is more likely to reject him for a while. So it will just take longer than normal. A month or two for a successful mate and another month or so for her to have babies.

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3 years ago#5
tropical_tiffini
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Okay, thanks. She doesn't seem to want anything to do with him, and she did give birth a little less than 3 months ago. Thanks again for your response!

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1 year ago#6
fitzer
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thats a male

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11 months ago#7
Fitzer
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Tiffini , did you lyretail male mate with any other types of Mollie? I've lyretail, balloon and normal mollies in my tank , my ballon male is trying to mate with everything that moves in the tank
Cheers
Fitzer

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5 months ago#8
Jadeen
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ya they can keep them in a separate tank or bowl and try
Good Luck

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5 months ago#9
NavigatorBlack
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This post was chosen to be featured as a blog.
Good Golly, what's a Molly?

Pet shop mollies are an entertaining genetic mess. They will all interbreed with each other, unless bad breeding has made the male's gonopodium disfunctional.
Originally, they took Poecilia species from Mexico. P sphenops and P butleri are west coast freshwater fish, P mexicana (freshwater) and P velifera (a sailfin which likes brackish to salt conditions) are Atlantic coast. They threw them all together and discovered while these species don't generally meet in nature, when they do meet, they breed. They added Florida and Texas mollies, P latipinna, the sailfin (both fresh and salt water), and finally, the pure freshwater Guatemalan and Mexican sailfin P petenensis went into the genetic soup. These fish are very far from the beautiful natural fish. You have 3 sailfins, and 3 shortfins, all mixed in to various degrees, and all capable of interbreeding.
Some of the results featured a probably painful genetic disease which some breeders thought was cute, and the sad little balloon molly hit the market (it is banned in some countries as 'cruelty breeding'.
I love mollies - really great fish. But if she has not become gravid in 3 months, something is off. The females keep packets of sperm alive internally and refertilize themselves after broods. Technically, they should not be non-gravid through their adult lives, as one sperm packet can successfully fertilize 5-6 broods. Sometimes the intense inbreeding and hybridization in these fish affects fertility.

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5 months ago#10
nyleve
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Isn't it also true that too soft water conditions can affect Molly breeding? I understood they preferred extremely hard water and the softer water created issues with the fry development???

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5 months ago#11
NavigatorBlack
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They need mineral rich water, but not sodium. They evolved over a limestone based habitat, and that water is hard (like a lot of North American water). If you try to keep them in soft water, they will be Ich magnets, develop fungus and have body slime problems. They need salts, but not "Salt". Hard freshwater is what you want, unless you have been unbelievably lucky and snagged some pure, wild type P velifera, or some coastal saltwater wild latipinna. That said, I caught latipinna in medium hard water in Florida.

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3 months ago#12
shane
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no not at all

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