3 years ago#1
Laryssa
Guest

Hello,
I have a 15 gallon tank that's been successful for about five months now. It has a running filter and a heater but it's freshwater. I keep the temperature about 78-80 degrees, and my meters say the ammonia and ph levels are 'safe.'
Up until yesterday, I had two small black mollies, one male and one female, and three zebra fish, all male. I noticed my male molly was being very aggressive to the single female, so I mentioned to my grandmother that I was going to go out and buy two female mollies to solve his testosterone issue. Today she came to my house with a surprise: two huge female mollies, one brown and one black. They seemed to be swimming in their bag from the pet store quite well.
I sat the bag in the water for it to adjust to the temperature as usual, and after a couple hours poured the fish into my net (over a bucket) and lifted them into my tank.
The large black molly adjusted immediately and has been swimming around with my original two mollies quite happily. However, I was at first alarmed the brown one was dead!
She hovered around the tank for a couple seconds, and sank to the bottom, laying on her left side (breathing ok it looks like) and moved very little. I was concerned, so I nudged her a bit with the corner of my net and she just kind of shifted a tiny bit, straightened so she was vertical, then layed on her side again.
After a short while, I saw her swim around with the other fish (but moving slower), then laying on the other side (right), not moving much. Now she's back to half-laying on her left side again, kind of supported by the fin on the gravel and the fin in the water moving. While she's laying, her tail fin moves very little, but I think it works ok, because she was moving it earlier when she was swimming slowly.
What's wrong with her? Is she too stressed out by the new tank? I don't think my conditions are bad because the other female I put in is doing just fine, as are the fish who have been living in there for awhile. What can I do to help my fish?

Posted on Tropical Fish
Answer
3 years ago#2
nexuslite
Champion
Blogs: 19
Forum: 1,555
Votes: 78

To properly acclimate a fish you need to also add tank water to the bag I usually add about 5 or 6 turkey basters of water over a half hour period before putting the fish in the aquarium. Some people say it is pH shock but I think it is salinity differences like when your ears pop when you drive up a really big hill or fly in a plain that is what happens to fishes gills if the change is to rapid. I've had a fish recover after 2 days of flopping on the bottom. I've also lost several fish not knowing how to acclimate properly. Just leave it be for now there isn't much you can do for it at this point it will either recover or it wont. Also when you put in a fish turning out the lights helps them adjust better or supposedly it does. I turn out the lights while i float the bag and turn them back on about 15 minutes after the fish is in the tank not the hour or whatever it is.

pH isn't supper important not as much as everyone claims I put fish into my tank with 8.0 pH all the time without any issues using the above method. There are definite mins and maxes on pH for fish though. ammonia and nitrite should be zero not 'safe'.

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2 years ago#3
Dalmatian Molly
Guest

I just got two mollies to put in my tank. Along with a female molly ,glofish and some fancy guppies one of the new mollies are fine but the other one of on the bottom of the tank barely moving and sometimes even skipping out on food what wrong?

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2 years ago#4
bree
Junior Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 31
Votes: 1

salt is always good

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2 years ago#5
bree
Junior Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 31
Votes: 1

treat it with salt tank salt

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1 year ago#6
Dino madness
Guest

I feal for ya there all my fish are at the bottom sitting there not even eating and my haraquin rosebora are swimming upside down.I don't know what to do I just don't want them all to die.

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