My gravel has algae on it. I siphon out the crud with regula...

G
6 years ago #1
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My gravel has algae on it. I siphon out the crud with regular water changes, but the gravel still has algae on it! I have an algae eater, but he sits in the cave and does NOTHING!Except create waste...

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achintya avatar
6 years ago #2
achintya
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lol, changing water doesn't mean that your aquarium will be free from algae. to clean this algae you have to take the gravel out from your tank and then clean it well. and if you have algae in your aquarium glass then you can use magnetic scrubber....

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dkpate avatar
6 years ago #3
dkpate
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Leaving lights on too long and/or too much natural sunlight will cause algae. You can do a 3 day blackout to kill it, but you will need to do water changes after that since the dead algae releases toxins.
How often do you change part of your water?

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KristinAnn avatar
6 years ago #4
KristinAnn
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I wouldn't take out all the gravel, as this would reset your cycle. I would start witha blackout, and then if that doesn't work, remove and clean only the top algae-covered layer, leaving as much as possible.
Siphoning may help a bit, and i definitely think you should do it, but it won't really remove stuck-on algae. Never push the vacuum all the way to the bottom in the whole tank, it will remove all your beneficial bacteria, which could actually lead to an algae bloom. Just the top layer, where leftover food and waste collects, is enough. If you must go to the bottom, do this on only half the tank per partial water change.
What size is your tank? How long has it been set up? What type of algae eater do you have?

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dkpate avatar
6 years ago #5
dkpate
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I push my vacuum all the way to the bottom every time. There is enough bacteria in the filter and on the decor, as long as your tank is cycled.

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KristinAnn avatar
6 years ago #6
KristinAnn
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Really? I never wanted to risk it. I do something like this:
Change 1: Half way on whole tank
Change 2: Half way on left side, to bottom on right side
Change 3: Half way on whole tank
Change 4: Half way on right side, to bottom on left side

Or at least I try to. I'm sure I lose track more often than I can even imagine haha.

This reminds me. I'm trying to set up my newly set up tank with a carpet of dwarf baby tears in front center, dwarf sword everywhere else. How does vacuuming go with that? Just sweep it over the surface? I'm worried about pulling up plants, especially the dwarf baby tears.

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dkpate avatar
6 years ago #7
dkpate
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Most people with plants just wave the siphon over the top of the plants and try to pick up as much as they can.

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johnarthur avatar
6 years ago #8
johnarthur
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If the substrate has a low spot with no plants, say near the front, it will accumulate most of the uneaten food. It would be OK to deep clean that part and surface clean planted areas to avoid disturbing roots.

In addition to excessive light, algae growth is encouraged by over feeding. Some live floating plants and a more conservative feeding schedule will probably reduce the algae. Since algae can house micro organisms that serve as fry food, a small amount is not a bad thing.

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achintya avatar
6 years ago #9
achintya
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perfect

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