3 years ago#1
mr.dovii
Fresh Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 7
Votes: 0

my ph level is 8.4 i used a tablet called correct ph from jungle brand. just one time and in my 10 gallon tank the water was clear after the tablet but in my 30 gallon the water is really cloudy after the tablet just over nigth. any ideas or advice. my fish are breeding so im trying to make it the water safe for my fish n fry .

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3 years ago#2
johnarthur
Blogs: 107
Forum: 24,727
Votes: 1,329

The high pH means the water is very alkaline. Some municipal water is taken from wells after it percolates through several layers of limestone. You may want to check the pH of your tap water.

The pH correction chemicals have only a temporary effect and thus tend to cause rapid shifts in pH. Sudden changes in pH or temperature are very stressful for the fish. Several methods are available to gradually lower pH; most involve adding tannins to the water. Common sources for tannins are driftwood, catappa leaf, peat, and formulations of black water extract. These will also soften the water. They may produce a temporary, light amber stain.

If your aquarium is fairly new, it may not have a working nitrogen cycle. This could easily cause pH shifts and cloudy water. If you are not familiar with the nitrogen cycle, please click the following link:
http://www.myaquariumclub.com/the-nitrogen-cycle-for- beginners-358.html

To solve the immediate problem, you may want to change about 25 percent of the water every two or three days. This will reduce toxic nitrogen compounds and may help stabilize pH. Once an aquarium is well established, the pH usually decreases slightly.

When replacing the water removed for the partial water change, warm it to roughly the same temperature as the aquarium water. Also treat it with a tap water conditioner that neutralizes chlorine, chloramine and toxic nitrogen compounds such as ammonia and nitrite. One good conditioner is Stress Coat Plus; many similar products are available.

As noted in the above link, the goal of the water changes is to reduce both ammonia and nitrite to zero and keep nitrate below 40 ppm. Once this is achieved, weekly or less frequent partial water changes will help maintain a healthy biological balance.

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3 years ago#3
mr.dovii
Guest

thanks for the help my problem is everytime i take water out and add new water from the faucet the ph and alkanity raise even higher so i dread changing water. i have 2 big pieces of drift wood in the tank i heard that was suppose to lower ph level. im trying to learn a healthy and safe way to get great water conditions my nitrates and nitrites are always zero to or a lil above and my hardness is always fine im thinking the faucet water is just really high with ph its this way with all my tanks i have 300 gallon a 150 gallon a 90 gallon a 29 gallon and 10 gallon all the levels are fine accept the ph and alkinity. i have south american cichlids. ive been trying to keep them healthy but the water is a problem. any ideas. i take out 25 percent weekly i use the syphon hose and in the rocks dig pretty deep i have had these tanks almost a year. so im confused on wht to do. weird thing is everytime i take a water sample to the local fish store or petsmart or petco they say the water is fine but apperantly its nt fine at all. and the fish always have a black lining on the end of there tails and fins. so any help would be apperciated

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3 years ago#4
nexuslite
Champion
Blogs: 19
Forum: 1,555
Votes: 78

I have a similar problem. My aquarium pH is always 8.0 and my tap water is always 7.8.

I've been playing with a brita. The water has a pH of 6.6 after it is filtered. It requires very little brita water to lower the pH.

I haven't got it all figured out yet and not sure how stable it will be once I put some in the tank. But it looks like a good alternative to chemicals. Mixing brita water with tap water to create the correct pH.

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1 year ago#5
Joe_450
Blogs: 1
Forum: 422
Votes: 17
nexuslite wrote:
I have a similar problem. My aquarium pH is always 8.0 and my tap water is always 7.8.

I've been playing with a brita. The water has a pH of 6.6 after it is filtered. It requires very little brita water to lower the pH.

I haven't got it all figured out yet and not sure how stable it will be once I put some in the tank. But it looks like a good alternative to chemicals. Mixing brita water with tap water to create the correct pH.


Could you expand on this brita water?! I have 8.2 and I need atleast 7.2 for my incoming rams!
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1 year ago#6
tina
Guest

I don't know about brita but I switched to reverse osmosis water, originaly from the pet store but recently got my own ro filter for about 70$. the ph of the ro is 6.4 and is VERY soft and that has helped imensly. also prior to that my ph rose to 8.2 just from the bubbler I had in as decoration. it dropped to 7.5 just by turning off that air pump. since the water is actually oxygenated by surface agitation not bubblers they are more of a hinderance than a help unless you are trying to raise the ph

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