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3 years ago#1
BetafishOwner
Guest

My water in my tank keeps getting cloudy, I have a Betta fish and a sucking loach, and the tank does have a filter i am not overfeeding as i feed twice daily and gets regular water changes, Since the water has became cloudy i have been doing 25% water changes daily to try and prevent the issue but the water remains cloudy, Any ideas on how to resolve this?

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3 years ago#2
nexuslite
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A lot of people experience cloudiness with new tanks. It should go away in time.

A small air stone will help particles settle. But your betta will not be happy with this they sell an air hose valve that you can use to adjust the flow of air down so it doesn't create too much turbulence for your betta.

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3 years ago#3
johnarthur
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Have you changed the fish food, or has another person been "helping out" the hungry fish? It happens. If the aquarium is small, it's especially easy to upset the biological balance. Sucker type fish also tend to create a mess in the substrate, and some get very large.

Have you checked water parameters to make sure the aquarium has no ammonia or nitrite? The presence of either could be indicative of an overwhelmed nitrogen cycle. In any case, the partial water changes should help.

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3 years ago#4
BetafishOwner
Guest

I use Betta pellets to feed the Betta and the loach also eats them, I feed 3 pellets twice daily, The ammonia levels are fine, and my fish dont seem to be acting any differently, when i have been doing water changes, theres nothing changing it just remains cloudy.
And i only live with my Gf and she doesnt go near the fish tank or food.

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3 years ago#5
johnarthur
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Have you checked to make sure the filter is not clogged? Does the aquarium have any hidden, decaying organic matter or sand pockets?

Since you are not over feeding, there must be a problem with a decoration, accessory or water treatment chemical. If the tap water is drawn from a deep well, it could have dissolved gasses that form small bubbles only after the water is no longer under pressure. It works like a bottle of pop and sometimes happens with Phoenix water. A fresh glass of tap water may look very cloudy until all the bubbles burst.

Since the water parameters are acceptable, you may want to cut back the partial changes to once a week and see if things will settle out. Finding the problem source will be a process of elimination, so the first place to look is any recent changes in equipment, food, decorations, maintenance schedule, etc.

Please keep us posted.

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3 years ago#6
BetafishOwner
Guest

Filter is fine, unclogged and gets a the sponge cleaned every 1-2 months in (Dirty water) Not fresh water, The food is pellets and my fish always seem to eat them before they can sink anywhere, although i have noticed recently that under the gravel is flakey bits and when i move around the gravel i find alot of bits flying around the tank, could this be the problem?

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3 years ago#7
johnarthur
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Decaying organic matter in the substrate could be the source of the cloudy water. You may want to deep clean about 1/3 of the substrate every week. Deep cleaning significantly more could remove too much beneficial bacteria.

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3 years ago#8
BetafishOwner
Guest

What would be the safest and easiest way to solve this problem, i want to try and not use chemicals, Do i remove the fish, do a partial water chance and than maybe clean the stones in dirty water?
Or is there other ways?

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3 years ago#9
johnarthur
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Do partial water changes with the fish still in the aquarium. The trick is to avoid sucking up gravel when you deep clean a section of the substrate. Some aquarium syphons have a large diameter, rigid pickup tube connected to a much smaller diameter flexible outlet hose. The large diameter pickup tube disperses suction power enough to pick up most of the crud without picking up any gravel. If the aquarium is small and you are using something like a half inch diameter flexible hose, slow the syphon by pinching the tube.

Please avoid removing the fish or deep cleaning all of the gravel at once. Also warm the replacement water to about the same temperature as the aquarium water, and treat it with a good tap water conditioner.

Getting netted and moved is very stressful for the fish, and so are quick changes in water parameters. Thus, the entire cleaning process should be gradual, and water changes should not be too large. If the substrate has lots of uneaten food or other waste materials, you can remove some of it using a turkey baster.

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3 years ago#10
BetafishOwner
Guest

Everytime i touch the gravel in the slightest it brings up loads of dirt and clouds the water instantly, I did a partial water change last night and the things you said to do, i woke up this morning and it was just as cloudy as before, Maybe i will have to use a chemical? or Clean most of the gravel? It's the only way i can think about making this water clear again, The fish seem to be healthy and happy still, But i'm not happy with them being in that kind of water. All i have in the tank is a Filter,Gravel,a plastic plant,Thermomiter,heater which i've always had in there so i know it's not these, 1 sucking loach, and 1 female beta fish. I've kept all kinds of fish in the past everything from Piranha's to Oscars and there messier fish than any of these two, but i've always managed to keep the water clear, so this is a mystery to me.

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3 years ago#11
nexuslite
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The cloudiness from the gravel is partially bacteria it is suppose to be there. However, I am sure some of it is dirt.

When you change the water do a gravel vacuum by pressing the vacuum down into the gravel do about 1/3 - 1/2 of the gravel at a time. This should suck up most of the dirt / bacteria. Do it every couple days until it doesn't cause as much cloudiness.

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3 years ago#12
johnarthur
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Patients works better than chemical flocculants.

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3 years ago#13
Lj Boros
Bronze Member
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once u have dun what they have suggested get a snale thats what i did and it solved the problem

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3 years ago#14
BetafishOwner
Guest

So if i do Partial water changes, How much water? 25% Daily? and how long should this take for the cloudy water to start to go away?

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3 years ago#15
Lj Boros
Bronze Member
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1 week or 2 but if u add a water clear chemical to it maby a week and 1/2

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3 years ago#16
nexuslite
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just 25% every few days with a gravel vacuum so you can get the gravel clean. It isn't super important the time frame of the water changes just make sure to get some of the gravel really good each time. Just until the cloudiness stops.

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3 years ago#17
Lj Boros
Bronze Member
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that is good advice

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2 years ago#18
liz
Guest

HELP. I have had my betta boys for over a year. Their bowls used to stay clear for a couple weeks. Now it"s a couple days and I'm changing the water. Same feeding. I use Publix Spring water and always have.. I let it set 48 hours before changing.

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2 years ago#19
Kevin
Guest

A bowl is not good for a Betta fish

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2 years ago#20
Eve
Guest

Not sure if you are still looking for an answer, but yesterday I was Googling for an answer to cloudy water in my Betta bowl to no avail. I decided to clean everything out YET AGAIN (I have been doing this every few days lately where before it was not a problem). I have a glass vase that holds close to 2.5 gallons, have live plants, a floating Betta log, a thermometer, a heater and NO filter (filters really are not necessary for Betta bowls). This has worked great for over a year only doing a thorough cleaning every few weeks.
I started to make up the new water in which to put Mr. Miyagi while I scrubbed everything with hot water, and in doing so I believe I found the answer. The water conditioner had gone bad. It has white cloudy clumps floating in it and mold in the bottom of the bottle. This was the one I bought at the pet store when I got the fish. Soon afterwards I found a different conditioner at Walmart that was MUCH cheaper so I got that one too. So yesterday I used the conditioner I got at Walmart and today the water is still crystal clear. Fingers crossed this is the answer. Anyone with almost instantly cloudy water; check your conditioner. I may even call the manufacturer; they should have a "use by date" on the bottle.
P.S. I called my daughter to tell her because she had the same problem. She said she had stopped using conditioner and used only filtered water and that worked fine until I looked after her fish while they were away. I cleaned out her tank and used my conditioner. She felt like a bad fish momma for not using conditioner so went back to using it (same brand that went bad on me). She is going back to filtered water.

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2 years ago#21
johnarthur
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When you clean everything, you also remove all the beneficial bacteria associated with the nitrogen cycle. As the cycle grows back, the water is often cloudy. Once the nitrogen cycle is established, the water should clear. As mentioned previously, a small filter will eliminate most of the problems you have described.

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2 years ago#22
SREEJI99
Junior Member
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I think you are too conscious on the water clarity. The clay content in the sand will make the water cloudy. Please leave the tank as it is without water changes for a week and wait for some time.
Patience can solve your problem.

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2 years ago#23
Courtney
Guest

I am having a similar problem. I have one very tiny betta and a snail in a medium sized bowl. There is a plastic log in the middle with some fake plants. Everything was rinsed and tap water added plus a water conditioning tablet. It has been less than a week and the water is a murky green color. Fish and snail seem fine

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2 years ago#24
Aliyah
Gold Member
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Green water is caused by single-cell algae floating in the water. It's unsightly, but not harmful to the fish. It is usually caused by direct sunlight and/or excess nutrients. Make sure your bowl is not by a window or in a brightly sunlight room, and that you are not overfeeding. Only feed what the betta can eat in a few minutes.

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2 years ago#25
christa211
Guest

the instuction on the tank i bought also said to keep the tank out of the sunlight!! sunlight will cause the algae and bacteria to grow quickly and if its a round bowl it was actually heat the water.. so if its in the sunlight get it out!!

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2 years ago#26
jelly
Guest

Can a flourecent light cause the same issue? My tank has been cloudy ever since I got it so I bought a larger tank with a filter and light attached. I have a heater which keeps the temp around 75 which I wouldn't think would be high enough to cause algae? The water conditioner is new and not out of date so I'm not sure what is going on. I think I'm going to get a bubbler?

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2 years ago#27
Kevin
Guest

See that your aquarium is not getting direct sunlight if still your water is getting green in colour what lamps r u using size / type and watts is your tank planted

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1 year ago#28
Lillian
Guest

You're tank looks awesome!! Is it a saltwater or fresh water tank? What kind of fish are they?

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1 year ago#29
Kevin
Guest

It's fresh water and the fishes are discus

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1 year ago#30
Kevin
Guest

Lillian It's 750 ltr and I love discus it's too difficult to maintain but yet it's my hobby

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