2 years ago#1
Guest
Guest

new tank, cloudy water, no fish.

i set up my new tank on sunday, its a aquastart one 28 ltrs put gravel, and decorations in it all prewashed, added water and the de-clorine stuff but yesterday it started goin cloudy and today it still is. i have a brandnew stingray filter in as the petshop said it was better then the others, i just wanna know if this is the start of a bactiria bloom or if ive done something wrong?? do i have to do a water change or shall i leave it

Answer
2 years ago#2
johnarthur
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The aquarium needs a nitrogen cycle:
http://www.myaquariumclub.com/the-nitrogen-cycle-for- beginners-358.html

While the cycle is developing, water parameters will fluctuate, and the water may become cloudy. Newly set up aquariums also become cloudy, because turbulence created by the filter keeps small particles suspended in the water. They usually settle out in a few days.

I hope you find time to read the material linked above. It's short, non technical and the key to successful aquarium keeping.

Please feel free to post more questions.

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2 years ago#3
Arbi
Fresh Member
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But if that dosent works then you should see if u have washed the gravels and the tank properly...once i had the same problem..idid a 2nd tym cleaning of evrythng and it worked.

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2 years ago#4
leanne
Guest

thanks for the help gonna look into it now hopefully it sorts itself out im really new to all this not as easy as some people make out this fish keeping.

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2 years ago#5
leanne
Guest

do i need to do this for just keeping goldfish? as thats what i want to have, its for my 2 girls as they have been asking for a fish tank for years and have finaly agreed, i want to do it propaly so i dont have no dying fish on my hands and 2 upset girls. The bloke at the pet shop just told me to clean everything put water in tank with gravel ect turn on filter and pump and wait a week not to do anything and to come back to shop in a week with a water sample and they will test it for me to make sure its ready for fish. I dont want to add anything to tank to see if it helps as its been on since sunday eve. I know i sound bit thick in asking all this just that when i was young all ya had to do was buy ya goldfish and a tank and just put water in and now its all changed.

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2 years ago#6
SM
Guest

Hi leanne, I am replying because I have finally read about someone else who remembers just buying a tank, adding water and fish!! We never had any problems and our fish lived a long time, except the occasional one but the others always did fine. There was no rule of "1 inch of grown fish per gallon" either. Our tanks never looked overcrowded and no issues with fish fighting and we just would choose what we wanted in the tank. I am getting ready to get a 45 gallon cube tank and am reading about all this "cycling" stuff and can't figure out why I never had to do it in the past. Can't just be luck, no way. Thought about the water but I lived different places so that can't be it either. The thought has crossed my mind that maybe it's a marketing gimmick but it really makes sense when reading about what the cycling is doing. I don't have an answer to your question but glad to find someone on the internet who remembers the way we did it growing up!! I'm sure others are out there but I haven't come across anyone else yet!! Best of luck to you and your fish.

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2 years ago#7
pamk59
Silver Member
Blogs: 7
Forum: 78
Votes: 6

did you put some clearwater inwith the dechlorinating liquid? i gotta tell you i did it for the first time and believe me its sparkly,also dont forget the carbon and rinse,rinse, rinse.

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2 years ago#8
Christi
Wiz
Blogs: 4
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Carbon is actually not necessaty. After a few days it looses whatever effectiveness it had (i still doubt it does anything). You can replace carbon with floss or sponge inserts

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2 years ago#9
pamk59
Silver Member
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Argue if you want but it works for me.

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2 years ago#10
Christi
Wiz
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Nobody is arguing. Having a difference of opinion is fine 0 its how we all learn and allows us all to form an opinion partly based on other peoples experience. Ita important that while we do have differing views, we express them politely. All I said is that carbon is not a necessity - I never said not to use it. I have had the same rank up and running for about 10 years and have NEVER used a carbon insert in the filter and I have ever only had one outbreak of ich which was caused by not doing a long enough quarantine on a new introduction. If it works for you then great but there is no reason to be defensive.

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2 years ago#11
Carla
Guest

im currently "TRYING" to cycle a 10 litre (2.6 gallon i think) fish tank....
ive put a rather large raw shrimp in a stocking in there.... the water has turned so cloudy... can hardly see in there at all...
i have a heater in there at 26 degrees.
i have a thermometer in there.
i have a filter in there on aswell.
a few silk plants and plastic plants.
and gravel.

is the shrimp too big???

i have bought test kits and the readings on day 2 are as follows:
Ammonia 10.0 +
Nitrites Nil
Nitrates Nil
PH 7.8

am i doing it right????

im setting it up for a betta fish...
I have no live fish in there at the moment.

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2 years ago#12
johnarthur
Blogs: 107
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The shrimp is wayyyy too big. All that's needed is a very very small pinch of fish food every other day. For the next several days, don't add any food. Then after doing nothing for about a week or more, check for toxic nitrogen compounds.

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2 years ago#13
Carla
Guest

thanks john,
so i take the shrimp out.
then feed the tank the "betta crumble" every 2nd day for a few days???
then do nothing???
then test the water in a week?

im sorry its all so confusing

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2 years ago#14
Carla
Guest

oh after reading your post again, your saying take the shrimp out.
then do nothing for a week or so .
then test for ammonia, nitrites, nitrate & Ph..?

i need the ammonia at zero
nitrite at zero
nitrate at less then 40
and ph around 7.0

is that correct???

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2 years ago#15
thea
Wiz
Blogs: 4
Forum: 6,587
Votes: 365

perfectly right.

Since you have a very high ammonia level it may be worthwhile to lower it a bit to start your cycle. (those who know better please correct me if I am wrong -- I am under the impression that if the ammonia is too high the bacteria may get overwhelmed -- is this wrong?)

Take out maybe half the water and replace it with new water (add the right amount of water dechlorinator)

Then run the tank and do nothing for a week.

Get the water tested and come back and report. We can give you then next step.

In a week you can start feeding your tank with a small pinch of fish food every 2-3 days.

Basically you will see the ammonia drop slowly and traces of nitrites will rise. Then the nitrites will rise and your water will start showing nitrates.

at some point in three-six weeks depending on the size of your tank, everything except the nitrates will drop to zero.

Then all you need to do is a large water change (after seeing that the levels are stable for a couple of days) and then you can add your fish. Best to drip acclimate them (article in the articles above)

Ph is not so important. Most fish can adjust to whatever you present them with within reason, so long as it does not fluctuate too much.

HTH

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2 years ago#16
Carla
Guest

thankyou that helps alot
its only a 10 litre tank (2.6 gallon)...

ill do 50% water change now.
then wait a week and then start feeding the tank with fish food...

will 'Betta Crumble' do the job???
its tiny lil crumb pellets for betta fish...

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2 years ago#17
Carla
Guest

ok so i did a 50% water change.
added the dechlorinater...

i did tests on the water after i changed water and these were the results:
ammonia: 10.0+
nitrites: nil
nitrates: nil


is the ammonia still too high???

it has cleared up the water just a little bit...
still very cloudy

im sorry i just have no idea....
ive made the mistake of putting fish into a new tank on a couple of occasions b4 and the fish just die.... so i wanna get it right this time
i had no idea that you had to cycle tanks... the silly people at the pet shops say nothing about it

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2 years ago#18
petlover
Guest

its still to high you might have crashed the cycle id say if u have a friend that has an aquarium and borrow a cup of gravel, it will seed the gravel with good bacteria and do u have a filter

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2 years ago#19
Love my tank
Guest

I have had a 120 gallon tank set up for years. In years past I used carbon in my filter. In the past 3 years I have not used carbon as the fish place that I trust explained it was not necessary. I have not seen any difference in my tank or my levels or odors with or with the carbon.

I find the key to a successful tank is not overstocking, not overfeeding (if anything feed less) and check your levels here and there. I do a partial water change about every 3 months if I need it or not.... but again my tank is established and don't overfeed and I rarely add fish.

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1 year ago#20
dannimc
Guest

I have the same problem, im wanting to get some fish tomorrow, will they be ok??

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1 year ago#21
thea
Wiz
Blogs: 4
Forum: 6,587
Votes: 365

We need to know more about your situation to be able to tell you if it is safe to add fish but if it is not an established tank and you have not cycled it (ie added a source of ammonia for several week to over a month) then chances are it is not safe to add fish.

Size of tank?

Cycled or not? What did you do to cycle it and for how long if it is?

Levels of ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate? Ph?

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1 year ago#22
Treesa
Junior Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 21
Votes: 1

We did the exact set up with a difference, we put a frozen prawn in a pop sock weighted down in the bottom of the tank, when the water went cloudy at first we changed out 80% of the water pre treated with tap safe, then 20% changes everyday for a week or two. We bought daughter a notebook and she kept a tank diary and after 3 weeks she added her fish. She understood that she was getting off lightly as we had to wait 9 months and did a lot of work to prepare for a new arrival and we wanted the same best possible start for hers.
Gave her time to research what fish were suitable, what temperatures are required, endler guppies do very well in the north uk but not so well in the south, we have very soft water up here. hope this helps you

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1 year ago#23
Treesa
Junior Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 21
Votes: 1

Just a thought, it all went cloudy at first because of the dust from the stingray and the gravel, we changed out 80% of that water iirc twice

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12 months ago#24
coops
Guest

I have the same problems, tanks been like it for 4 days now, is this normal. I have no fish in yet and all the stones have been thoughly washed.
when I set up the tank with the stones it was clear for 2 days then when cloudy. Help pls

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4 months ago#25
k-Bomb
Guest

Leave it alone! it is cycling that is normal and can take awhile to clear up, but it will clear up.

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3 months ago#26
Jacquie
Guest

I got a new fish tank I think it's a thirty but when I set it up earlier it was not cloudy now it is what is up

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3 months ago#27
goldbetta
Bronze Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 55
Votes: 1

Please this was answered two years ago u will confuse others if u post like that

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1 month ago#28
holly
Guest

I have fish in my tank and its cloudy. Do I put pump on or. Not as I think its cycling.

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