2 years ago#1
mackimo
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I have been looking this up, but I keep getting so many awnsers! Im thinking about getting a 5.5 gallon tank with heater and filter and everything else needed. About how many glofish could I put in there? Everyone is like none, they need 10+ tank. but what about the 2.5 tanks they sell specially for glofish and fish related to them.

For example>>> http://www.petsmart.com/product/index.jsp?productId=11418815&utm_source=shopzilla& utm_campaign=11418815&utm_medium=cse&mr: referralID=03d7dd54-b3f2-11e1-ac63-001b2166c2c0 (not planning on getting this one since so many bad reviews by the way)

Also, I have heard some people talking about sponge filters and how the airstones work just as good in a small tank, such as 5.5 gallons, is this true?

Posted on Tropical Fish
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2 years ago#2
gloman
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Hi! I'm sorry to say the correct answer really is none. The reason is that glofish should be kept in groups. Now, some will say groups of 3 are ok, but I personally feel 6+ is better.

Adult glofish can be about 2" long. If you follow the one gallon per inch rule, you would need a 12 gallon tank for six glofish. Five glofish in a 10 gallon tank would probably be OK, but I wouldn't add any more than that, and that's also the minimum I would do. You will absolutely have to be conservative on feeding, and keep up with a regular partial water change.

Also, don't use a blacklight. They are fine for a few minutes occasionally, but not long-term permanent use. No more than about 15 mins.

Sorry, I don't have any info on sponge filters.

Hope this helps! Don't forget to cycle your tank before adding any fish.

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2 years ago#3
jerry
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if you want the glo fish to be happy u need at least 5 and they need room to swim...i have a 30 gal and they shot around like it nothin... they swim in place in the current from the filter.. im currently lookin for a bigger take to give them more room... they are really cool

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2 years ago#4
mackimo
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Thanks everyone, I shall look for a bigger tank.

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2 years ago#5
IanL
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I have 30 gallon with 10 total danios. 5 regular zebras and 2 Glo's they school together happily. Let me tell you, these guys MOVE!!!! it sucks hearing people get all PETA saying "not a big enough tank, that's cruel" but it is true and you will find yourself feeling bad and looking to upgrade sooner rather than later. Save yourself some time and money and start with the biggest tank you can reasonably house and take care of. Not to mention the slightest change in water quality of small tanks will wipe everything out like the hand of God and they are the hardest size to manage correctly.
I hope everything works out for you. (no idea about sponge filters, sorry)

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2 years ago#6
jerry
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i like to feed my glo fish brine shrimp,,, there like little rockets they shot around the tank feeding

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2 years ago#7
mackimo
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I have gotten a 12-13 gallon tank (I know, its a weird size) thanks for all your help. Maybe next year I will move up to a 20- 25 or maybe even 30, but for now I am sticking with this tank. I can't actually even start preparing thetank till after July though, since I won't be home all July. I can only moveas big as my dresser will hold, because I have no room for a fish stand.

Do you think 3 - 4 glofish is okay with two lyretail mollies for the size of my tank? I was originally just going to get glofish, but I have fallen in love with lyretail mollies.

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2 years ago#8
gloman
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I applaud you patience in doing what's best for your fish and waiting until you can setup, monitor and cycle your tank before introducing fish. You are awesome!

I personally feel that with a 13 gallon tank, it would be best to stick with only glofish. They should be kept in groups of at a minimum 5 or more. Plus, they get to be about 2" fully grown. If you go with the 1" per gallon rule, that makes a 10 gallon a bare minimum. It's a good practice to never max out the suggested bio-load, which you would be in a 10 gallon. The 13 is pretty close.

I wouldn't suggest mollys because they are livebearers. You should always have more females than males to reduce aggression, but they will breed.

Check out this site:
www.aqadvisor.com

Here is its warning on glofish and mollys in a 12 gallon tank:

Suggestion: If you want to keep more than 1 Molly, minimum recommend male to female ratio is 1:2 (M:F). You will be less likely to experience problem if you get even more females.
Warning: At least 5 x Glo Fish are recommended in a group.
Recommended water change schedule: 22% per week.
Your aquarium stocking level is 89%.

I would suggest sticking with 5 glofish.

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2 years ago#9
mackimo
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Thanks! I will stick to glofish, thanks alot! I will wait a year or 2 to get a bigger tank, then I will get some mollies.

By the way, my friends 9 gallon tank has 4 glofish, a lyretail molly (pregnant), a xray fish, and another kind of fish I don't know the name of. So, that means her tank is way over populated. Is this why the water is always gets really dirty really fast and why almost all the fish have ich?

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2 years ago#10
gloman
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YES!

That's a big yes to you patience, and a big yes to friend's tank problems.

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2 years ago#11
mackimo
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I have one more question, I am going to get 5 glofish. WHat if I get a snail, like maybe a mystery snail. Would that still be okay? Or would t overpopulatemy tank. Of course if I can get one I would wait a month or two so that I can make sure there is some algea for it ad tomake sure my fishtank is healthy.

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2 years ago#12
gloman
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As far as your bioload goes, a mystery snail should be fine.

1. Make sure you cycle your tank before adding any fish. This forum has several good articles about the nitrogen cycle and fishless cycling.
2. For the size tank and number of animals, make sure you purchase plenty of filtration. My philosophy is more is better. I try to buy a filter one step up from what's recommended. So if you have a 12 gallon tank, I would skip the 10-15 gallon filter and go with a 20 gallon filter. It helps to move more water around, and also because snails poo a lot! I am partial towards Marineland Bio-Wheel filters, but I really think any filter will work.
3. Glofish are tropical so they will need a heater and thermometer.
4. A tight fitting hood is a must. The snail may crawl out.
5. Invest in a water test kit. You need a kit that will test for ammonia, nitrites, and nitrates. There are strips that seem to be cheaper, but I don't like them. I find them to be inaccurate. I prefer API liquid kits, like the Master Kit that has all 3 tests. It's pricey at first, but is way cheaper than the strips per test.
6. A small gravel vacuum will be handy to clean off the substrate. You may want a bucket to make water changes easier.
7. A water conditioner to remove chlorine from tap water.
8. Maybe a glass scrubber.

It sounds like a lot of stuff (because it is ), but I wish I had a list from the beginning so I didn't have to make multiple trips back to the pet store. Invest in the test kit and do a fishless cycle to get your tank ready. That will save you a lot of frustration.

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