2 years ago #1
tr3bla
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What should the readings be at to keep a healthy fish tank.

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2 years ago #2
jjdaJetplane540
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If its freshwater should be zero nitrate,nitrite,and amonia. hardness should b round 80ppm, kh shld b 120-180ppm, and ph between 7 n 8. Also will depend on fish what do u have?

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2 years ago #3
tr3bla
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In my 55 gallon , i have 4 cory jullis , 4 koi angelfish , 4 veil angelfish , 1 peacock eel , few ghost shrimps , 1 pleco , few neon fish , 1 ghostknife , 1 elephant nose , and 2 african bush fish (leaf fish) also have 2 more tanks with various fish . any other input on fishtank would be greatly appreciated , so far they are all happy or look happy , no chasing around

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2 years ago #4
jjdaJetplane540
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How are ur amonia levels u have quite a few in tank

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2 years ago #5
tr3bla
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I have the 6 in 1 test strips and dont see amonia on there , probably need to get a different test

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2 years ago #6
jjdaJetplane540
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I would def.get the they have one at walmart for rnd ten bucks made ny jungle its cheapsst place ive found.for those n plus they jave the 5 n 1 for ur ph n stuff

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2 years ago #7
tr3bla
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nitrate is 0
nitrite is 0
hardness is 150
chlorine is 0
alkalinity is 80
ph is 7.2 - 7.8
dont know if either 1 of these represent ammonia

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2 years ago #8
jjdaJetplane540
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U need to buy a seperate test kit for amonia

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2 years ago #9
Luvn Bubbles
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it all depends on the fish. ammonia, nitrite, and nitrate should remain at 0 for all fish, but hardness, softness, and ph depends on the fish and plants.

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2 years ago #10
tr3bla
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thanx , bought a ammonia test and if im right with the color of the tested water its .25 not unless thats as yellow its goin to get then its 0 , but nitrite and nitrate are 0, @ luvn bubbles , nice fish on your profile pic , is that a betta

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2 years ago #11
Luvn Bubbles
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yeah. he died 3 days ago from ammonia poisoning. he was a spirited little guy though.

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2 years ago #12
gloman
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A fully cycled tank will have zero ammonia, zero nitrites (with an "i&quot, and nitrates (with an "a&quot should be present, but less than 40 parts per million.

Test strips are not very accurate, and are actually very expensive per test. Most on here recommend the API Liquid Master Test Kit. It seems expensive upfront, but considering that you get 100's of tests, they really cost pennies per test.

All fish have "ideal" pH suggestions. However, many fish will do just fine in a different pH if they are properly acclimated. Attempting to alter the pH typically causes fish death because these alterations are temporary, and even slight shifts in pH can be lethal.

The best suggestion is to thoroughly research the individual needs of any fish that you are planning on keeping.

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2 years ago #13
tr3bla
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how long does it take to fully cycle , ive had my tank for quite some time , 55gal _ 5months , 30gal - 1 yr , 20gal - 9months , and 10gal - 2months but when i started the other tanks i would use water from my oldest tank , even with a lil bit of the waste at the bottom , do you think that was a good idea but even so i do my weekly , bi-weekly water changes (20%) and havnt really lost too many fish with the exception of shrimps n neons which i think my other fish are eating

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2 years ago #14
gloman
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The length of time has several factors, but tank size is the main one. Larger tanks take more time to cycle. Having fish in the tank makes it last even longer. Fishless cycling is the fastest and safest. This is very unscientific, but I would plan a month for every 10 gallons. It doesn't really take that long, but that may help avoid the urge to quickly place fish in an uncycled tank.

As long as there was no lingering disease, moving water wouldn't hurt anything, but it wouldn't help anything either. Most of the beneficial bacteria live in the substrate and filter media. Some people will move "seed gravel" from a cycled tank to a new one. This might take a day or two off of the total cycling time.

The best way to determine if a tank is cycled is to track your water tests.
1. Ammonia will be zero and then skyrocket.
2. A bacteria begins changing ammonia to nitrites. Ammonia will decrease as nitrites increase.
3. A second bacteria grows changing nitrites into nitrates. Nitrites will decrease as nitrates increase.

A tank is cycled when ammonia & nitrites consistently test as 0, and nitrates are present but are less than 40 ppm.

Here is more info:
http://www.myaquariumclub.com/the-nitrogen-cycle-for- beginners-358.html

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