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4 years ago#1
maureen_spiro
Fresh Member
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2 of my adult angels just laid their first eggs on a broad leafed plant in my 55 gallon aquarium. We have no idea what to do with them (the eggs). Will they hatch and survive or will the fry get eaten by the other fish in the tank? How long before they hatch? Can I sell them to interested buyers?

Help!

Hate to see their hard work gobbled up but not sure how to proceed...

Answer
4 years ago#2
dkpate
Champion
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Welcome to the forum!

Here is a good article on that: http://aqualandpetsplus.com/Cichlid,%20Angelfish%20IV.htm

And if that doesn't give you enough info, JohnArthur will most likely be on here in the morning and he knows alot about angelfish.

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4 years ago#3
dkpate
Champion
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Well, I don't know why the whole address didn't post, but if you copy and paste the whole thing into your browser window, it should work.

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4 years ago#4
achintya
Wiz
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wait for a few hours until mr john see it.he is the master of angel fish...

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4 years ago#5
johnarthur
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A spawning pair of angelfish usually needs an aquarium to themselves. They will defend their eggs against other fish and will fan them to keep off fungus. In a few days, fertile eggs will show signs of life, and the parents may move them. The wrigglers slowly turn into a head and a tail, and their head exudes a sticky substance that keeps them glued to the plant leaf. In the next stage, they become free swimming and will finally use up their yolk sac. That's when they need baby brine shrimp. There are a couple of easy methods to supply live brine shrimp, and it's also available frozen. At any time, the parents may decide to eat the eggs or fry to "protect" them. New angelfish parents are especially prone to this, and many times their first spawn is not fertile. Fertile eggs have an amber coloration, and infertile eggs develop a white fuzz. A mated pair of angelfish can spawn every week or two.

In a community tank, I doubt any of the fry will survive. There is, however, an alternative to letting the parents raise their fry. Known as pulling the eggs, it involves removing the leaf or spawning media with the new eggs and placing it in a ten gallon aquarium with a slow running sponge filter and no substrate. To keep the eggs from getting a fungus, keep a lite stream of air bubbles running on the them. The water also needs to be sterilised with peroxide or methylene blue. I forget the exact ratios. When the fry are free swimming, they need to be fed several times a day, and any uneaten food must be removed. They also need a partial water change every day.

That's sort of a brief summary. If you want to read about the process in detail, go to the MY ACTIONS button at the top of the page. One of the options that will scroll down is "Find a Member." Tell it to find Megham, and it will lead to a list of blogs and posts she wrote. She kept a day to day account of the entire process, and it's very informative. Of course, you're also welcome to ask more questions.

Angelfish are not very predictable especially when it comes to spawning. You just have to let them teach you. You should keep the aquarium at about 82 degrees. If you can, remove all of the other fish. I forgot: angelfish will inspire you to buy many more aquariums.

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4 years ago#6
maureen_spiro
Fresh Member
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Thanks for the answers by you and the others! This all seems to be very expensive and time consuming but I guess we'll try to be successful breeders the first time through.

We have had lots of success with the platies in our community just having their babies in the tank (we have lots of vegetation so they have been able to hide from the bigger fish). We currently have 3 generations of them in the tank.

I'll let you all know how this goes but I guess I'm not feeling very confident. It's all a learning experience either way.

Thanks again for the helpful responses!

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4 years ago#7
starter fish keeper
Guest

hey i got a question for the master!! i have a angel fish that is pregnant she and what i hope is a male are in a tank by them selves when she lays her eggs and the male fertilizes them should i move the eggs to a 10 gal to let them hatch Thanks alotur the best!!!

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4 years ago#8
johnarthur
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Although I'm not a master, maybe I can help a bit.

If you're going to pull the eggs, you should do so right after spawning is complete. To get the ten gallon tank cycled, operate a fine pore sponge filter in the spawning tank so it gets seeded with beneficial bacteria. After a couple of weeks, put the sponge filter in the ten gallon tank. The temperature in both aquariums should be about 82F. After the angelfish spawn, put the spawning media (plant leaf or what ever) in the small aquarium, and finish filling it with water from the spawning tank. Install an airstone so its bubbles gently flow over the eggs. To prevent fungus, put in some methylene blue or hydrogen peroxide. I'm not sure how much, because I always let the angelfish parents do the work.

The rearing tank needs to stay very clean, and water movement from the filter and bubbler should be very gentle. The fry can eat baby brine shrimp and powdered food like Hikari First Bites as soon as they use up their yolk sacs.

As an alternative to hand raising the fry, you can let the parents try. Sometimes, they eat the eggs or fry to protect them from a perceived threat. Parenting skills usually improve after a few spawns, and it's really quite an interesting process.

A while back, one of our members (Megham) kept a diary with pictures of angelfish spawning and raising their young. She posted it as a blog; it's very informative for anyone who wants to try angelfish, and you can find it by using our SEARCH function.

Spawning and raising angelfish requires several aquariums and quite a bit of patience. Despite their aggressiveness, angelfish are very sensitive to water conditions. They're a challenge but well worth it.

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3 years ago#9
tania
Guest

can i put the leave with the eggs on it in a guppy breeding cage in the comunity tank and when they hatch just feed them the shrimp?

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3 years ago#10
marty
Guest

excellent post .... have had two pairs lay eggs many times over with the first pair keeping the fry alive and not eating them which they did every time afterward .... it was awesome to see the female with a global looking batch of babies above her head following in sync like a school.

Just today, I realized I had my third pair and got the odd guy(girl)out due to serious fighting among the winning male or female.

They are cleaning a 4 inch rock and a plastic plant, but according to what I am seeing online, a broad based plant is what is needed .....seems they look for anything vertical and flat....the other two pairs used the filter intake device.

What else can I use .... now.

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3 years ago#11
johnarthur
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If you plan to remove the eggs, a piece of slate or a section of PVC pipe are appropriate spawning surfaces. Angelfish often move their eggs, and they are a bit unpredictable when it comes to selecting spawning sites.

Successful spawns usually require a separate spawning tank and another one to raise fry. Angelfish do sometimes spawn in a community aquarium. However, the eggs need to be removed, and spawning angelfish are very aggressive toward any tankmates.

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3 years ago#12
marty
Guest

Thanks .... I think I'll let the eggs stay in their tank (it's only two angels in a 20 gallon tank) and see what they do with them .... already going to get a broad based leafy plant unless I see some slate in the store ... I can get a 55 gal for free and may put the babies (fry) in that tank and raise them to sell and give away.

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3 years ago#13
marty
Guest

the angels laid eggs on a thin leaved plant and not that many eggs. They are all white which tells me from past experience that the male didn't do his job OR is not mature enough yet ..... they are fanning the unfertilized eggs and seem to think they have fry coming....I am guessing they will eat them sooner or later.... I had three in there and the day after I removed the third guy out, they spawned.

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3 years ago#14
johnarthur
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Eventually they will eat the infertile eggs, or the eggs will fall off the leaf. They may spawn again in about two weeks.

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3 years ago#15
marty
Guest

That they did. I am assuming the male **** up or is in puberty and not ready yet ...I didn't see them laying the eggs .... hoping for more as the other pairs did every few weeks like you said.

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3 years ago#16
truger1975
Guest

Hi Johnarthur,

I have been doin massive amounts of checking things out. I have a weird pair of angels.I have just the two of them in a 35gal tank. They tend the eggs to the point of wigglers and then.....the slate is clean..
I am supposing I will have to pull the eggs

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3 years ago#17
johnarthur
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That's pretty common behavior for angelfish. The waters where their ancestors originate have some large predators, and aquarium fish retain all of the related coping tactics. For example, when eggs or fry are threatened by a predator, the parents eat them. This at least avoids nourishing the predator, so it's a viable survival tactic.

In an aquarium, angelfish may see any movement of a large object as a threat. Think of how large a person must look to them. When spawning pairs get some experience they may calm down. You can also add some big hiding places or even cover the exterior glass with thick black paper.

One theory is commercial angelfish operations always pull the eggs for maximum production, so the resulting generations lack parenting skills. You can try pulling the eggs, but raising fry by hand is some work. Watching the parents take care of fry is much more interesting. They usually nurture the little fish until they start to grow true fins.

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3 years ago#18
bob mccoy
Guest

ty john i needed to find a guy like u. im breeding two pair and was clueless

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3 years ago#19
johnarthur
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You may want to click the following link for some more detailed information:
http://www.myaquariumclub.com/the-growth-and- development-of-freshwater-angelfishpterophyllum- scalare-107.html

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3 years ago#20
cindyb
Guest

I don't have the space or $ to set up a separate tank for the eggs my angels just laid. One of the parents is a "wild caught". I've only had them since Thanksgiving.

I do have a small "maternity breeder" that is about 8" x 4" and it hangs on the side of the tank. Can I put the leaf with the eggs on it in there, hanging inside the regular tank? Then if they hatch I could frozen brne shrimp?

I have a 26 gal bowfront tank. It has 4 angels, the parents and 2 smaller ones, 6 harlequin rasboras, one flying fox. The small angels have been hiding lately. One always hides because one of the big ones harasses it a lot. The 2 big ones are hanging out by their leaf. It has a lot of eggs and most of them are beige, only a few white ones. Today is Thursday and I know the eggs weren't there Sunday...

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2 years ago#21
meli79
Guest

Our angel fish laid eggs on our filter? what should we do. the other fish were eating them but we put a very loose panty hose over the filter to protect them the parents r still guarding them what are our chances of them making it?

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2 years ago#22
Kelci
Guest

Hey, You seem to know a lot about Angelfish / tanks. For some reason my fish have been dying all the sudden. I've had the tank for about a year now, and in the last month this has been happening. I do clean my tank, I do feed them. My Angelfish is the only one that's alive. I had Glofish and others..I want to change everything out of the tank, water, plants, rocks at the bottom, everything! I heard by putting the Angelfish in another tank with new water etc it will die? What do I do????

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2 years ago#23
sarahrhiannon
Guest

Johnarthur. The info in the forum has helped us so much. We are in the process of all of this with our angel fish. It's very new to us. We bought our fish about a month ago and I woke up yesterday to one of them "brushing" up against a decoration in our tank, I thought hmm thats odd, until I looked closer and saw eggs. We dove head first into this, we have never had eggs before with any of our other angel fish.
We separated our tank and the angel fish have free reign over half of it. There are at least 50+ eggs, half of them are clear and the rest white.
I'm looking to learn from them and let them do what they wish, just sitting back and hoping for the best.
They seem very protective and haven't left the eggs all day.
Only time will tell I'm sure!

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2 years ago#24
ghost
Guest

wow how do you know so much about angelfish?
do you work at a fish store or did someone just tell you

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2 years ago#25
ghost
Guest

have you been through this all the time.
because you know a whole bunch of information.
my angelfish only laid eggs once I know they will hatch them again because I got it off another site but when will they hatch more?please answer me as soon as you can

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2 years ago#26
johnarthur
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The spawning pair need their own aquarium. In a community tank, the eggs/fry will get eaten by their parents or tankmates. If this is their first spawn, it may not be successful. Rather than let the parents care for the eggs and fry, some aquarists put the eggs in another aquarium.

My preference is to let the parents nurture their eggs and fry. It's a very interesting process. When the eggs are fertile, you can see a bit of movement in just a few days. A magnifying glass is handy for this purpose. After the eggs show some movement, a little black dot will appear. This becomes a pair of eyes. In a couple more days, a very small tail will appear on the other end of the egg. The eggs and fry have an adhesive material on their head, and this allows the parents to move them.

In about a week, the eggs are much more active, and some may start to swim. They will still have a prominent yolk sac and cannot take food before the sac is fully consumed. At this point, the adhesive material will be absorbed.

The parents will try to keep all of the fry in one area of the aquarium. If they are startled or perceive a danger, the fry will be eaten. In the wild, this practice denies food to predators.

In two or three weeks, the fry will start to develop actual fins. Usually I remove the spawning pair at this point, because the likelihood of them eating the fry increases. In rare cases, angelfish will have two batches of fry in one aquarium.

Recently, a pair of angelfish in one of my aquariums spawned for about the sixth time. In previous spawns, they ate eggs and fry. This time I was lucky, and the fry are growing on a diet of finely ground staple flake food and newly hatched brine shrimp.

I'm not sure if the question about angelfish knowledge was intended to be facetious. The answer is about 20 years spawning angelfish, exchanging information with other aquarists, reading printed matter, and making lots of mistakes. Angelfish are unpredictable and something of a challenge to keep and spawn. If you want to spawn angelfish, you will need several tall, large capacity aquariums.

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2 years ago#27
Paul
Guest

HELP! I only have one large angel fish which i have had for years. There has not been another Angel fish in this tank for over a year.This morning I discovered eggs on the glass and the Angel fish is chasing the other 4 fish away. Obviously, these eggs were not fertilized because there has not been another angel with her for over a year.but she is really protecting them from the other fish. Are the eggs fertilized by the male AFTER the female lays them. Is it possible that the eggs are fertile? How long will these eggs remain on the glass and for how long will she keep chasing the other fish away. THey cant hatch, can they?

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2 years ago#28
johnarthur
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Since the eggs are infertile, they will develop an opaque white fungus and will eventually get eaten by the angelfish or her tankmates. You may want to consider getting another large aquarium and a male angelfish. Raising angelfish is both interesting and challenging.

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2 years ago#29
Paul
Guest

Thanks. The Angel fish is protecting the eggs and chasing the other fish away constantly. Should I remove the eggs and bring peace to my tank or just wait and let nature take its course? When will she give up and eat the eggs? Thanks so much for this web site.
Paul

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2 years ago#30
doug
Guest

what a awsome link ty. helped us alot.

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