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5 years ago #1
Rachel
Guest

Okay.. I have had a goldfish die from this 2 weeks ago, he just lay at the bottom of the tank breathing, then died

And this one (splash) is doing the same. I have had him 1 week. For all of yesterday he just lay at the bottom. I fed him and he didn't move

I just looked over to see him looking at the top for food but i think he might go back down to the bottom soon or maybe even to his other fish thats now in fishy heaven..

Im new to fish keeping btw, and its a 10 gallon tank??

Thanks

Posted on Cold Water Fish
Answer
5 years ago #2
mystic_goldfish87
Gold Member
Blogs: 5
Forum: 226
Votes: 9

Since your new to aquarium I'd like to welcome you hardily to the hobby. but also since your new I'm assuming your tank is fairly new as well. chances are your tank hasn't gone through the maturing cycle. this cycle begins about 2-3 weeks after your tank has been set up and ends a month or two later. Basically there is more to fish tanks than setting up equipment and filling it up with water. fish need bacteria as well. the bacteria can only come naturally. While the bacteria are forming and balancing them selves out it's not uncommon for fish to die for no apparent reason. for more details I have found the link below to be an excellent source of info. there are things you can do to help this cycle move along quickly. first find some one who already had a tank for more than a couple months and ask them if they will give you there dirty filter. while gross this is where the bacteria are you simply put it in your own filter or rinse it out in the tank. the second thing you can do is get water conditioners. water conditioners can be found at any pet store and are not the expensive. I personally think getting someones filter is much better though. (the best things in life are free, lol). Although there is some debate the last thing you can do is 50% water changes every other day. I personally thing this prolongs the cycle and stress the bacteria more than it helps anything. I hope this helps and feel free to keep us posted.
http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?c=16+2154& aid=2657

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5 years ago #3
Rachel
Guest

Thanks so much.
Yeah when i got the tank, the guy in the pet store said we needed water conditioner and good bacteria so i put 3 drops of that on every day, but my mom said (lol) im not allowed any more because they dont last but i hopefully can work on her

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5 years ago #4
bartimaus
Gold Member
Blogs: 10
Forum: 139
Votes: 6

Tell her that everyone starts off a little rocky, but you learn and get better with time. If we all stopped keeping aquariums after the first...or second , round of fatalities, this forum would probably not exist.

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5 years ago #5
mystic_goldfish87
Gold Member
Blogs: 5
Forum: 226
Votes: 9

bartimaus hit it right on the money lol. I cant even tell you how many fish I've lost while starting a new tank, lol. but if it's a matter of having a mom involved I can say starting a tank with a goldfish is probably not the best thing. on your next fish try a betta, they give off the natural chemicals needed to start a tank and they arn't as reliant on the water as a goldfish. so in a month or so you'll be able to put what ever fish you want in it with no or very little problems.

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4 years ago #6
Jezzybelle
Guest

First of all thanks for everyone not guilting us n00bish fish-killers. I just have one Betta right now, Chronos, who is probably around a year old. I just changed his tank a few days ago and I cleaned it up perfectly and changed all of the rocks. But I saved the old rocks, if I put some of the old ones in, would that help Chronos? I'm going to try it because I don't expect an immediate response and Chronos isn't doing so hot.

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4 years ago #7
johnarthur
Blogs: 107
Forum: 25,456
Votes: 1,355

If you clean up everything really well, you could kill the beneficial bacteria that make the nitrogen cycle work. The following link discusses some of the basics in a way we hope is not intimidating. http://www.myaquariumclub.com/your-first-aquarium-how- to-make-it-successful-564.html

Every one of us started as a newbie, and we're still learning. You are most welcome to join in the discussion.

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4 years ago #8
Jezzybelle
Guest

That's exactly the conclusion I came to when I started skimming sites like this, and it's why in a desperate attempt to reverse the problem I put some of the old slimy rocks back in. I went and picked up some sort of bacteria-helpy stuff at the pet shop but Chronos just didn't make it. He was getting pretty old though.

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4 years ago #9
mjrkiller308
Champion
Blogs: 27
Forum: 1,930
Votes: 49

im sorry to hear that i too have angelfish and they just have so much personality and they are the easiest fish to fall in love with(in my opinion) i lost one as well about 5 days ago he was a spinop peruvian zebra mix. but hey they are in fish heaven now and im sure its better there than here lol. keep ur head up and dont give this hobby up its a great bond and study between your fish and tanks. welcome to the site as well. R.I.P Chronos

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4 years ago #10
Peter (aquaman)
Guest

Hi Rachel, Goldfish are fairly hardy creatures; if the ones you have at the moment are sick, try taking them out of the aquarium and placing them in a plastic bucket with just a small air stone and pump.

Do not feed them for several days. If they survive you can then presume it is a problem in your aquarium. Remember goldfish are one of the largest producers of poo and waste.

A good idea is buy a simple book on goldfish from your pet shop; this will give heaps of helpful hints.

In my large aquarium started off the cycling process with a couple of goldfish before adding cold water fish and cichlids. They survived the full few weeks of cycling and are still alive and healthy.

If the goldfish you have isolated in the bucket seem well after a week. Wash your aquarium and filter out with fresh water.

Fill the aquarium with fresh water; add water conditioner or chlorine neutralizer. Then add the water and goldfish from the bucket.

Do not use rainwater or tank water as this is to soft, also if you have a wood burning fire in your home the toxic and carcinogens from wood smoke residue that wash off the roof can be toxic to both fish and humans.

What you have to consider is your goldfish will now start a new cycle process in the aquarium, if they survived in a bucket then they should survive in your aquarium. Also you do not need a heater on a goldfish aquarium.

One tank I built for a friend for their goldfish was an old marine aquarium. Because it had a surface area of 3 ft by 2 ft there was more surface area for oxygen exchange.

On the surface we placed several artificial water lilies. The goldfish seemed to like the islands of shade under and around the lilies.

So with your goldfish tank try not to overstock it, and keep it simple.

Best Regards

Peter

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4 years ago #11
Jezzybelle
Guest

What a gorgeous tank, Peter!

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4 years ago #12
Peter (aquaman)
Guest

Hi Jezzybelle, Thanks for the compliment about my aquarium. Though a bit large the fish like it. The goldfish love the caves, tunnels and over-hangs.

Their nature has changed from goldfish to sort of gold cichlids. To see them mixing with the other fish is great to watch.

Though a large aquarium I have seen many small aquariums that have been set up by their owners that also are a great pleasure to look at.

One aquarium set up on the wall at the entrance to an aquarium shop in Canberra City was only a few foot square about four inches from front to back with a polished timber frame.

It had living plants and just twenty or so neon tetras. The colour contrast between the green of the plants and the school of neon’s was very striking.


Years ago I set up an aquarium for friend’s daughter. She was autistic and some other illness. The aquarium was an old marine one. There were only a couple of fish in it and they were in a poor state of health.

Taking the aquarium home first carefully removing the top glass centre braces. I cleaned it right out. Then from concrete, plastic pipe (for tunnels) and some river rocks, constructed a mini mountain for the centre of the aquarium.

Making a couple of shelves in the side of the mini mountain to hold gravel and some plants. Worked into the mountain made several tunnels. Leaving access to the back of each tunnel so small 12 volt coloured lights sealed with silicone could be easily pushed in place.

These lights when on, cast a coloured glow along each tunnel passage. So when the room lights were turned off the mini mountain lit up like a small house.

When finished I painted the sculpture with 2 pack pool paint to seal the cement.

When the paint had fully dried and everything was finished on a return trip I took back the aquarium to our friends place. The helped me to lower the mini mountain back into the aquarium to be fully set up with fish, plants and other equipment. Finally before adding water and fish we re-glued the top glass tank braces in place with silicone,

They contact me from time to time. They say the only thing is during the evening their daughter is difficult to get away from the aquarium, as she will sit for hours just watching the fish and coloured lights.

So no matter how large or small your aquarium might be, Setting it up as you and the fish like it, if all goes well it is a great hobby.

Regards

Peter

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4 years ago #13
Jimmeh
Guest

Peter

I beg you to go MAC

http://www.myaquariumclub.com/members/sign-in.html

so I can search for your post's as your storys are really good.

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4 years ago #14
Peter (aquaman)
Guest

Hi Jimmeh, Thanks for the compliment finding that I may in some small way be helping fellow aquarists is its own reward enough.

I thought you might like a desktop picture for your computer. Just click on the picture with the right mouse button.

When the Drop-Down Menu appears simply click on the "Select as Background option. This will make it your desktop wallpaper.

If it does not fit to full screen simply go into your Control Panel and Display properties and tell the computer to "Stretch to Page".

Best Regards

Peter

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4 years ago #15
Peter (aquaman)
Guest

Hi you would have to use so little (2 drops) of chlorine neutralizer for the partial change in a 10-gallon tank. It would also be too risky as you could overdose the fish.

Boiling water gets rid of chlorine so every time you make a cup of tea or coffee simply save the spare water that has been boiled from the kettle.

Just pour it into a 2 gallon plastic bucket and simply use this water for changes. Never any more need to risk using the neutraliser.

Regards

Peter

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4 years ago #16
Jimmeh
Gold Member
Blogs: 8
Forum: 210
Votes: 13

Thanks for the photo,

but you still need to sign up,

Ill set it as my wallpaper when im finished managing all my pc's

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4 years ago #17
Peter (aquaman)
Guest

Hi Jimmeh,if I want to see the posts I have submitted and how some of the members are getting on I simply type in the club search window "including the brackets"

Peter (aquaman)

You can do this with any of the members or guests by simply typing in their name or members ID. The search window is also good for looking up different items or subjects.

The feedback Emails the Myaqariumclub send to members and guests are a great service also.

No matter how large or small an aquarium each one has its own uniqueness and charm for a great hobby.

The following website shows some large aquariums built into homes.
http://www.luxhomes.com/showthread.php?t=110

Take care and all the best.

Regards

Peter

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4 years ago #18
maaz
Platinum Member
Blogs: 0
Forum: 433
Votes: 9

nice Peter Aquaman i like ur idea of saving energy and water both..well done..

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4 years ago #19
mobella
Blogs: 12
Forum: 182
Votes: 0

almost every time i get a new tank the fish die a if we all quit on the first death of a fish nobody would own fish

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4 years ago #20
brittany
Guest

my fish is laying on the bottem 2
































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4 years ago #21
johnarthur
Blogs: 107
Forum: 25,456
Votes: 1,355

Unusual behavior usually means the fish is under stress and is thus vulnerable to diseases and parasites. Many times this can be traced back to water quality issues.

For example, any ammonia or nitrite in the water is toxic to the fish and will produce considerable stress plus burned gills. The solution is a working nitrogen cycle and regular, partial water changes. For more details, click the TOP ARTICLES list at the upper left of the page.

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3 years ago #22
cat lover 62
Guest

mystic goldfish, make shure you dont put and shiny or colored fish with a betta, they are extremely agerssive. Even if it is a verry dull colored fish, they may still kill it so be carefull

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3 years ago #23
LUCY
Guest

HI CAN YOU HELP ME PLEAS MY FISH IS NOT BREATHING WELL WHAT DO I DO

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3 years ago #24
Rohan
Master
Blogs: 8
Forum: 3,232
Votes: 98

Is your goldie gasping at the surface?

do you have any filter? what is the size of the tank?

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3 years ago #25
mjrkiller308
Champion
Blogs: 27
Forum: 1,930
Votes: 49

is your tank airated well and is the water cold because they are cold water fish and there is a better supply of oxygen in colder water. also how often do you change your water and how much each time. are his gills inflamed and red. i am at the library and leaving soon so i will personal message you my phone number and call me and i can assist you further ok. nevermind your a guest i cant pm you my name is jason and my digits are <phone> id call fast if i were you good friend

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3 years ago #26
johnarthur
Blogs: 107
Forum: 25,456
Votes: 1,355

Lucy: The best way to help your fish right now is to syphon out about 40 percent of the aquarium water, and replace it with conditioned tap water of about the same temperature. Over the next few days, you may need to do some smaller, partial water changes. This will dilute any toxins in the water and make the fish more comfortable.

If the fish is not eating, don't feed her/him. Fish can go for more than a week without eating. When you do feed, give the fish no more than they eat in a couple of minutes. Uneaten food decays into toxic ammonia. Other decaying organic matter also produces ammonia, as do the fish's respiratory and digestive systems. In a well balanced aquarium, the nitrogen cycle neutralizes the toxins and is helped by weekly partial water changes of about 25 percent. If you're not familiar with the nitrogen cycle, please click on the following link:
http://www.myaquariumclub.com/the-nitrogen-cycle-for- beginners-358.html

Thank you for visiting our forum. You're always welcome to ask more questions and/or join us.

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3 years ago #27
Limikka
Guest

Hi
My fish have all started dying this week - 3 today so far. It is a metre long tank that had 6 fish in it, it now has 2 (although one looks like it is on its way out). We have had the water tested, have done a change of water and used the stuff the shop gave us and re tested the water yet they are still dying. Its not amonia as I thought it might be. I am at a loss as to what it could be. Ive not fed either.

One fish looks really happy and healthy and the other keeps laying on the bottom in a corner or behind a stone, it then comes out, swims around quite fast for a while, goes back down and keeps repeating this. The others have verged on doing this and being totally fine one minute and dead the next.

Any advice greatly appreciated.

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3 years ago #28
johnarthur
Blogs: 107
Forum: 25,456
Votes: 1,355

Free water tests from the pet shop are not always accurate, and their standards can be somewhat loose. For example, the test results may indicate ammonia and nitrite levels are OK when in fact they are not. Both are toxic to the fish, and both should measure zero.

How often do you change part of the water, and what species does the aquarium house? If partial water changes have been infrequent, you may be dealing with old tank syndrome. In this scenario, ammonia or nitrite builds up to a level that the nitrogen cycle cannot handle, thus suddenly releasing one or both toxins into the aquarium water. The main effect is a weakening of fish immune systems. This in turn makes them vulnerable to opportunistic parasites and diseases.

Very often, a few partial water changes will remedy the situation by restoring fish immune systems. A fairly large partial water change (about 30 or 40 percent) followed by some smaller ones for the next few days could make a significant change for the better in your aquarium. At a minimum, partial water changes are a safe, first step in dealing with aquarium problems.

If the partial water changes do not solve the problems, you may need to medicate the aquarium. For a list of fish diseases, symptoms and cures, please click the following link:
http://www.myaquariumclub.com/how-to-recognize-and- treat-disease-in-fish-what-is-wrong-with-my-fish- 477.html

Again, before resorting to medicating the aquarium, make sure the water is safe and appropriate for the fish species you're keeping. Good luck, and please keep us posted.

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3 years ago #29
Susan H
Guest

Hi. I have only ever owned bettas as a kid and never really got into fish untill about 3 months ago. My two year old son asked for a fishie. I talked to my husband and we decided to go ahead and get some fish. We have a thirty gallon tank with 2 fancy goldfish and 1 albino goldfish 3 cherry barbs and two plattys and a cleaning fish. Sence the begining our ammonia has been off the chart and we cant seem to get it down. The fish are eating fine and swim constantly. However today the 3 goldfish are layimg on the bottem of the tank and not moving much. I am out of ideas on how to get the ammonia levels down and is that what is wrong with the goldfish the other fish dont seem bothered. Our albino barb we had died a few weeks ago and my son was devistated. I cant stand to see him cry that hard over the fish. I sont want to keep having this problem. I know fish will die but I still wish I could get the amonia undercontrol thanks.

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3 years ago #30
johnarthur
Blogs: 107
Forum: 25,456
Votes: 1,355

Daily, partial water changes are the primary way of reducing ammonia concentrations. However, some tap water conditioners are available to treat chlorine, chloramine, ammonia and other nitrogen compounds, plus heavy metals. One type is API Stress Coat Plus.

This will not help establish the nitrogen cycle, but it will make the aquarium water safe for fish. That assumes you change about 25 percent of the water every week. Using this method, the nitrogen cycle will gradually get established and the fish will be safe.

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