Very Low Light Plants

What are some very low light plants out there?

My dad just realized that plants need light and now he's a little reluctant for me to have plants. Are there any plants that can thrive in a tank without the lights on?

I'm thinking of buying this:
http://www.aquaticplantcentral.com/forumapc/plantfinder/details.php?id=75
Would this plant work?

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Posted on Tropical Fish

rpsp_07 avatar
#2
3 years ago

I have no personal experience with the plant in that link. But I have had awesome success with anubias in low light. I have some in my qt tank that has no lights in it at all.

Geoffrey avatar
#3
3 years ago

Thanks, I'll be on the look out on Craigslist for anubias. They're so expensive in pet stores.

The plant in the link above is selling at 6 for $7 so that's why I'm contemplating it. Although I think the selling is only selling the stems/clippings.

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blaneyoba avatar
#4
3 years ago

Hygro is a very tolerant plant to different light levels ,and no plants with thrive in a tank with no lights ,most stem plants really need a stable photo period each day and won't grow great with the light being turned on a couple of hours one day ,none the next and so on ,you wont get uniform growth and they will usually start to die at the base , if you want easy ,very tolerant plants stick to anubias,microsorum(java fern) ,even some crypts are really tolerant to crazy light cycles ,my advice if you don't already, get a timer for your lights because as well as plants fish will also appreciate a stable light cycle 😊

Geoffrey avatar
#5
3 years ago

Well, it wouldn't be complete darkness, there would still be some natural light, but no direct sunlight. Would this still count as no light?

Also even if I do turn on the lamp, the wattage of my bulb is 17W and I have a 30 gallon. So that's still quite low at about .5 watts per gallon.

blaneyoba avatar
#6
3 years ago

Yeah I would class that as no light when dealing with plants, plenty of "low light" stem/rosette plants do still require a decent amount of light over them ,you may be able to just get by with your 17 watt with hygro but I wouldn't count on it , $7 isn't a grand expense and you could at least try it and see if it survives in your set up(most stem plants are sold as cutting BTW), you could get away with quite a few cryptocorynes with your 17 watt as well as the listed anubias and java ferns, bolbitis heudelotii is a nice large low light fern also I think you could get away with in such low light

Geoffrey avatar
#7
3 years ago

Okay, thanks. I'll look for these plants.

As you can tell, I'm very new at planted tanks. I have few other question.
When growing these plants (crypts, anubias, ferns), or plants in general, how does one multiply them?
Do you multiply them or do you just buy lots of them?
Do you clone them? If yes, how would do this?

I just realized, I should have started this thread in the Aquarium Plants category :/

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blaneyoba avatar
#8
3 years ago

Propagating plants really depend of the type , java fern ,anubias and bolbitis leaves grow off a rhizome which the roots grow from , the rhizome can simply be cut to make up many plants but you should leave at least a couple of leaves on each cutting as they store energy and will help them bounce back , stem plants you simpy cut and replant and the remaining cut plant should throw off side shoots , crypts will simply throw runners and plants will grow around them once they are settled ,crypts really should have a type of root tab type fertiliser as they are quite heavy root feeders and will flourish with them , a lot of plants will actually grow little plantlets on their leaves(java fern does) ,go do a bit of research on aquatic plants ,they really do add a whole new aspect to the hobby and make it that more interesting , I will never have a non planted tank again 😊

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